Posts Tagged ‘prequalify’

New guidelines for PMI

March 5, 2018

Not that long ago, conventional loan guidelines began allowing borrowers to have a back debt to income ratio as high as 50%. The “back” ratio is the new housing payment + all other debt / monthly income. The limit was 45%, so the increase allowed  borrowers to carry a slightly higher debt threshold. This is closer to what FHA allows (up to 55%).

Private Mortgage Insurance companies observed the change, and then began making changes of their own. As of this post, all but one of the major PMI companies have changed their guidelines to reflect the following requirement. For borrowers with a debt to income ratio at 45-50%, their credit score must be over 700. For all other borrowers with a debt to income ratio under 45 %, credit scores can go as low as 620. While this change won’t impact a majority of home buyers, it is significant. Basically, if a buyer has a higher debt to income ratio and  a credit score under 700, then they must use an FHA loan to buy a home (or VA if they qualify for a VA loan). For now, conventional loans may not be an option.

Guidelines change frequently, and this could be temporary to see how conventional loans with a debt to income ratio of 45-50% perform. Hopefully that will be the case, but for now, it is in place.

Planning on using a conventional loan to purchase a home, but have a high debt to income ratio? If you are buying a home in Georgia, let’s talk sooner rather than later and make sure no changes need to be made to current plans.


HELOC interest potentially tax deductible

February 27, 2018

A clarification has been issued by the Internal Revenue Service about the deductibility of interest that is paid on home-equity lines.

Under the Republican tax law, joint taxpayers can deduct interest on home loans. This includes first mortgages used to secure primary and secondary homes. OK. Sounds right. Nothing unusual so far…

What caused a ruckus was the suspension of the interest deduction for home-equity loans, home-equity lines of credit and second mortgages from 2018 until 2026.

But an exception exists!

WHAT?? Really? Tell me more!

The IRS clarified the new tax law in response to many questions submitted to the IRS by taxpayers and tax professionals. According to IR-2018-32 issued Tuesday by the agency, when HELs & HELOCs are utilized to buy, build or substantially improve the residential properties used as security for the loans, the interest is tax deductible. An example of a deductible expense is when the proceeds from the loan are used to build an addition to an existing home. On the other hand, if the proceeds from lines of credit are utilized to pay off personal expenses, no deduction is allowed.

As was the case under the prior law, the equity line loan must be secured by a primary residence or second home, not exceed the cost of the home, and meet other requirements.

How to proceed? Contact your tax professional. While the IRS provided the clarification, it also said “meet other requirements.” The IRS also did not distinguish how to apply if portions of the equity line was used. For example, what if someone has a $100,000 equity line. They use $80,000 for an addition to the home, but $20,000 to pay off credit card debt.

While this is welcome news, its application can still be tricky. Contact your tax professional today to find out more. If you need a referral to a tax professional, do let me know!

Any hope for mortgage rates?

February 15, 2018

As my colleague recently posted, mortgage rates are off to a rough start this year. As of this post, mortgage rates are a half point higher for the year. I won’t dig into the details of why this is happening. Rodney did a great job of it in his recent post. Today, I’ll focus on what can turn the tide for mortgage rates.

Stocks have suffered a rough start to the new year too. That is normally great news for mortgage rates. Normally as stock prices fall, bond values rise, and mortgage rates improve. The Dow fell over 2,000 points at one moment over the past few weeks, and yet mortgage rates also got worse. If a 2,000 point drop couldn’t help mortgage rates, what can?!?

We must look back at one of the root causes Rodney discussed – inflation. Mortgage rates hate inflation as it eats away at the value of mortgage backed security bonds. As those bond prices fall, mortgage rates rise. The way to help mortgage rates is to combat inflation. The best weapon we have at our disposal is the Federal Funds Rate… the Federal Reserve can continue increasing the Federal Funds Rate. In fact, every time they’ve done that over the past couple of years, mortgage rates have initially improved. Why? The higher the Federal Funds Rate goes, the more it can combat inflation.

Of course, the flip side is raising it too much can cool off the economy (don’t want that). Also, with the new budget deal passed last week by the government, more bonds will be sold to fund the increases to our national budget. More bonds available for sale also lower bond values, pushing mortgage rates higher. As I said in a post late last year, the environment for mortgage rates to get worse is here. That seems to be occurring. While mortgage rates are still low, the time of super low rates could finally be behind us.

The Federal Reserve could increase the Federal Funds Rate to fight inflation and help mortgage rates, but given the other factors at play, the increase to the funds rate may not help improve rates over the long haul for the time being.

If you’ve been sitting on the fence about purchasing a home over the past year because “rates are so low, why hurry,” the time may be now. If you are purchasing in the state of Georgia, contact me. We can get the prequalification process completed in minutes and have you ready to go out and find your new home!


Recent Mortgage Rate Changes

February 13, 2018

Wow!  Our economic world has gone crazy in recent weeks.  The Dow Jones average has dropped about 7.9% since its high on January 26, less than 3 weeks ago.

Mortgage interest rates have been changing dramatically too.  Rates have increased a half point (0.5%) since January 2.  Back in mid-December, I quoted an interest rate to a first-time home buyer named John.  Today, in mid-February, I would likely have to charge him 0.625% more than what I quoted in December.

So, what is driving the rapid mortgage rate changes?  In short, Wall Street, economic factors, and government policy.

To understand the basics, first realize that the vast majority of conventional mortgages are sold by lenders to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.  Fannie and Freddie then package these mortgages into mortgage backed securities (MBS).  Money managers, pension funds, insurance companies, mutual funds, etc. buy the MBS to keep in their investment portfolios.  They buy and they sell them like other investments. 

That means that the same economic factors that influence stock and bond prices – economic productivity, unemployment, inflation, and government policy – all impact mortgage interest rates.  And MBS must compete with other investment vehicles such as stocks and bonds to attract investors.

Many experts consider the market for 10 Year Treasuries as a benchmark or comparison for MBS.  Both investments offer stable, predictable cash flows.  Since January 2, 2018, the 10 Year Treasury rate has increased almost 0.4%.  Looks like interest rates on these competing investment vehicles are rising at the same time.

Given recent positive unemployment figures and wage growth, inflation concerns are increasing.  Higher inflation expectations tend to drive higher interest rates on Treasuries, bonds, and MBS.  Let’s face it, if investors expect inflation to be 3%, they will want to earn more than 3% on their fixed-income investments, right.  So as inflation concerns rise, it is logical to expect mortgage interest rates to rise accordingly.

When it comes to mortgage interest rates, there’s much more to consider, and we will delve into more details in future posts.  For now, if you know someone in Georgia who is considering a home purchase, please have them contact me.  We at Dunwoody Mortgage offer competitive rates in this changing environment, along with outstanding service to get home buyers to closing on time.


Tools to Access Your Home’s Equity

January 11, 2018

Home owners often seek to use their home equity as a source of cash.  They can use this cash for renovations, paying off other high interest debt, funding college educations, etc.

Owners typically access their equity by either (1) paying off their current mortgage and obtaining a new, higher-balance mortgage using a “cash out” refinance or (2) obtaining a home equity line of credit (HELOC).  Each option has some pros and cons.  The new federal tax law somewhat changes the pro / con dynamic.

Under the 2017 tax law, mortgage interest paid on loan balances up to $750,000 remains deductible on your federal taxes.  However, the tax law eliminated the mortgage interest deduction on new home equity loans and lines of credit.  But note that this only affects home owners who itemize their taxes.  And with the doubling of the standard deduction under the new tax law, the number of households that itemize deductions is expected to drop from 34 million to 14 million.

So, if you are considering accessing your home equity, first think through whether this tax change will affect you.  If you are a single filer and your itemized deductions including mortgage interest would be less than $12,000, the interest deductibility will not affect your decision.  If you file jointly and your itemized deductions would be less than $24,000, interest deductibility will again not affect your decision.

Here is my list of benefits for each option:

Cash Out Refi:

·        You can obtain a fixed rate loan.  The monthly principal and interest payment will never change.  HELOC rates are variable and your payments will increase when market interest rates increase.

·        You can deduct all interest (on loan balances up to $750,000) as part of your federal tax calculations as described above.

·        You reduce your outstanding loan principal with every payment.  The monthly payments reduce your outstanding principal every month.  HELOC payments are interest only.  For people who don’t have the financial discipline to pay down HELOC balances, the cash out refi forces you to reduce the loan balance monthly.


·        You can access more of your home’s equity.  HELOC’s typically allow up to 85% loan balance (first mortgage plus HELOC) to home value or loan to value “LTV.”  Cash out refis only allow a maximum 80% LTV.

·        You pay less for the loan itself.  Closing costs are typically lower for a HELOC than for a mortgage.

·        You can pay less each month.  Required HELOC payments are interest only.  By not paying down part of the principal each month, your monthly payments will likely be lower with a HELOC versus a traditional  mortgage.   

Next post, we will cover some “rules of thumb” when choosing between a refi and a HELOC.  Own a home in Georgia and want to access some equity?  Give me a call at Dunwoody Mortgage and let’s review your options.  We can consider the advantages of each as we guide you to the best solution for your situation.


My (FHA Loan) Christmas Wish List

December 19, 2017

FHA loans are great for certain borrowers.  I look to FHA loans when my clients have credit scores of say 680 or less, little available cash for a down payment, and want a 30 year mortgage.  FHA loans also can help a home buyer who has a higher level of other outstanding debt, as FHA guidelines allow slightly higher debt to income ratios.

FHA loans typically offer lower interest rates than conventional loans, but they do have some limitations.  But now there is some movement in Washington to change some of these limitations.  Let’s pretend that the federal government is Santa Claus.  Here’s my FHA mortgage wish list:

  • Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif has introduced the Making FHA More Affordable Act.  This bill would repeal the “life of the loan requirement” for FHA mortgage insurance.  Right now, if a borrower closes an FHA loan with a less than 10% down payment, the mortgage insurance is permanent – it never goes away.  In contrast, the mortgage insurance is cancelled automatically on a conventional (non-FHA) mortgage when the outstanding principal balance reaches 78% of the home’s original value.  In my opinion, this would be a good change for consumers who need FHA financing.  I don’t think they should have to pay the mortgage insurance after they have 22% equity in their home.
  • Under Ben Carson, the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) issued a report signaling an easing in FHA requirements for condominiums.  Currently, to close a FHA loan on a condo, the condo complex must be on the FHA approved list.  Condos apply for FHA approval based on a number of FHA-specified criteria.  If the complex is not on the FHA approved list, a buyer cannot obtain a FHA loan and must obtain conventional financing.  The National Association of Realtors reported that of the 614,000 condo sales in 2016, only 4% were closed with FHA financing. 
  • In addition to loosening FHA condo complex approval guidelines, the administration is also indicating that it wants to revive FHA’s “spot loan” program.  This program allows homebuyers to purchase a  condo in a complex that has not been approved for FHA financing.  Some estimates have claimed that without the spot loan program, 90% of condo projects cannot have buyers with FHA mortgages. 

We mortgage lenders must work within the rules defined by the regulators – we don’t make the decisions.  But I think the above changes would be very positive, as they would make home and condo ownership less expensive and more realistic for buyers who need the FHA loan program. 

If you know a potential home buyer in Georgia who wants to know if they are on Santa’s, sorry, FHA’s, “good list,” have them contact me at Dunwoody Mortgage.  We will work within FHA guidelines (and explore other potential loan options) to make sure they get the best deal on their mortgage, and hopefully enjoy some FHA guideline “gifts” from Washington soon.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!!


Republican tax plan and mortgage rates

December 12, 2017

All signs are pointing to the Republican party passing tax reform. The Republicans are using the “budge reconciliation” process to get the bill passed. By going this route, the Republicans avoid the need for 60 votes for approval in the Senate while preventing the Democrats the ability to use  a filibuster. Whether you opposed tax reform OR couldn’t wait until it arrived, tax reform seems likely to be here once the House and Senate finish reconciling their two tax reform bills.

What does this mean for mortgage rates?

Initially, nothing. On the surface, tax reform has no direct impact on mortgage rates. This is just like when the Federal Reserve raises the Federal Funds Rate. The Funds rate impacts second mortgages, car loans, credit card rates, etc., and not mortgage rates. But…. the impact these have on the market can impact mortgage rates.

Stocks have been on a major rally for roughly two years now. The DOW continues to set record highs. Why the surge? Wall Street has bet on tax reform that would benefit business. Trump’s election prompted a big rally back in November 2016, and this rally continued throughout 2017.

Now that tax reform is here, stocks seem poised to continue their good run and maybe continue to push higher. As stock values rise, bond prices normally fall due to the fact that people are putting more money into stocks than bonds. As bond values fall (specifically mortgage backed security bonds), mortgage rates go up. While tax reform doesn’t directly affect mortgages rates, the impact on stocks can influence mortgage rates.

Frequent readers of this blog are aware of how stock prices/mortgage backed security bond prices impact mortgage rates. If you are new to this blog, use this link to read past posts about the subject. 

Currently mortgage rates are definitely off of their yearly lows and moving back toward their yearly highs of 2017. Combine tax reform, continued stock market rally, and the Federal Reserve no longer purchasing bonds from quantitative easing (they are beginning to sell their bonds now), and you have an environment where mortgage rates could go noticeably higher.

Market analysts have said for years now (since 2010) that “this is the year mortgage rates go up,” and rates haven’t gone up. When do I think rates will go up? At this point, I’ll believe it when I see it. That said, the environment for mortgage rates to increase is as real as it has ever been in the past several years.

Considering refinancing or buying a home, but been pushing it off since rates are so low? Maybe now is the time to at least have a conversation about your plans, timing, and how to proceed? If the home loan will be in the state of Georgia, I can help! Contact me today and we’ll get started!


Conforming Loan Limits going up!

December 5, 2017

For the first time since 2006, there is a significant increase in the conventional loan limit. The new maximum loan amount for conventional loans will be $453,100. Technically there was an increase from 2016 to 2017 (from $417,000 to $424,100, which is less than a 2% increase). This time the maximum limit gets a more significant increase.

What does this mean?

Buyers can purchase a $477,000 home with only a 5% down payment. If using a 3% down conventional loan, then the buyer can purchase a home as high as $467,000 in value. Prior to the increase, if a buyer wanted to purchase a home at $500,000 and avoid a Jumbo loan, then the down payment needed to be 15% to get the loan down to $424,100. Now a $500,000 home can be purchased with less than a 10% down payment.

This increases the purchase power for home buyers, and these new conventional loan limits can be used now! The start date for the conforming loan limit increase is January 2018, but the loan process can start today and close after the start of the new year!

Looking to buy a home in the state of Georgia? Wanting to use a conventional loan to purchase $500,000 or so home using a small down payment? Now you can! Contact me today and we’ll get going on your new home!



Waiting Periods After Derogatory Credit Items – Foreclosures

October 24, 2017

Our nation’s economy has shown positive growth for several years now, following the Great Recession.  Many folks who were hit hard during the recession have rebounded and are doing well now.  Back when times were tough, they may have faced financial crises like home foreclosures or bankruptcies.  These financial crises appear as “derogatory items” on a credit report.

So let’s say your cousin Phil went through a really tough stretch financially.  But he persevered, got that new job, has been paying his bills on time and is saving some money.  He asks you if you think he can win mortgage approval now so he can buy a new home.  Like most people, you really don’t know how to counsel Phil, until now!

You can tell Phil that certain derogatory credit items carry mandatory waiting periods – he must let a specific amount of time pass before he can apply for a new mortgage.  There are different waiting periods for foreclosures, bankruptcies, and short sales.  And the waiting periods also vary by the type of loan Phil can get – FHA, VA, jumbo, or conventional.

Let’s start with a foreclosure.  Phil wasn’t able to make his home payments and the bank foreclosed.  Here are the required waiting periods by loan type:

  • FHA – 3 years
  • VA – 2 years
  • Conventional – 7 years, unless the foreclosure was part of a bankruptcy, in which case the wait is 4 years
  • Jumbo – 7 years

It is important to note that the waiting period “clock” starts when the foreclosure deed is recorded with the county.  In some cases, it may take the foreclosing bank several months to document and record the foreclosure deed after seizing the property.  So as a borrower with a past foreclosure, Phil needs to understand that the waiting period clock does not start on the date that the bank seizes the home.  I have run into situations where the bank took quite a few months to record the foreclosure deed, and this little date detail almost delayed the new mortgage.  Many times, the borrower may not know when the prior bank filed the deed after the foreclosure; however, this information is public record and most counties have the data available online now.

We will look at waiting periods after bankruptcies in the next post.  For now, if you or someone you know is like Phil and wants to buy a home, but has a past foreclosure, please refer them to me at Dunwoody Mortgage.  I will pay close attention to the details and even look up the old property online, if necessary, to make sure the borrower meets all lending guidelines.  Don’t waste time looking for a home until you have a high degree of confidence you can close!  I’ll work with you up front to give you the confidence you need.


PIWs are back!

October 10, 2017

Every few months, there are changes made to loan guidelines. Often, the changes are minute and not worth talking about very much. This time, there is something worth discussing.

Property Inspection Waivers (PIW) are back! Technically, they’ve been back for a while, but it was rare to use them. But what are PIWs? Property Inspection Waivers mean a borrower does not need to order an appraisal for the loan if they are satisfied with the value Automated Underwriting (AUS) assigns it. These have been available, but really only used with making a significant down payment (or having lots of equity if the loan is a refinance). How much is significant? Lets say 40% or more in equity.

With this latest change, Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac are saying it will be more widely used and available for clients with smaller down payments/amount in equity – even for purchase transactions.

Currently, I am working with clients on a refinance with just 20% equity and no appraisal needed. How is this of benefit to the borrower? For one, it saves money. Appraisal costs range from $450-$500, and the PIW fee is only $75. It also creates a much quicker turn time for closing. Imagine closing start to finish in under two weeks.

Lenders will not know if a loan will qualify until it gets into Automated Underwriting. That means the borrower will have to apply and be under contract on a home with the final purchase price. That said, it is always great to have the opportunity to save money and close faster! We’ll see how well this rolls out, but it’s good to have PIWs back as an option.