Posts Tagged ‘preapproval’

Lock and shop with rate float down

April 25, 2017

Last time we discussed the competitive market for home buyers. I suggested getting underwritten prior to making an offer on a home. That way the offer can say the buyer is “approved” and can close in about two weeks (only need the appraisal!). When I talk about this option with clients, they also ask about whether they can lock the interest rate. Most lenders/banks prefer a buyer be under contract to purchase a home, but that isn’t the case with Lock and Shop.

Buyers can lock in their interest rate today without a purchase contract, and then go out looking for a home. The program typically works like this:

  • We start the loan process as if we have a contract to purchase a home.
  • We submit the loan to underwriting for approval, and can lock the borrower into a 60 day rate lock.
  • This provides plenty of time to find a home, get under contract, and complete the closing

This is a great program for buyers. They can go ahead and get underwritten for a home purchase. They can also lock in a rate now, and not feel so pressured to find a home before rates could possibly get worse. With a 60 day lock, there really isn’t a rush on either side of the equation (finding a house and then getting loan approval). 60 days is more than enough time for both!

On top of that, there is a one-time FREE float down on the rate lock. The window to use the float down is within 30 days of closing (or rate expiration) and 8 days prior to closing (or rate expiration). If interest rates have improved by 0.250% or more, the rate can be lowered to the current market. That’s it. No fees and no tricks. There is a roughly 3-week window to use the float down, and rates must be improved by 0.250% or more.

If you’d like to learn more about the lock and shop program for a home purchase in Georgia, you know where to find me!

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Mortgages and Filing Tax Returns

March 22, 2016

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It’s tax season, and you are trying to buy a home. Not only must you navigate finding a home, applying for the loan, and filing your taxes, you may not realize that the tax filing could impact qualifying for a mortgage.

Well, it can impact qualifying for that home mortgage, and how much it impacts depends on how one is paid.

I’ve talked in the past on this site about how it is just as important how someone is paid instead of just how much someone makes. After April 15th, how someone is paid also impacts the documentation required for the annual income tax filings:

  • W2 salary: will need proof of the filing of the tax returns. If an extension is filed, proof of the filed extension. If money is owed on the tax extension, proof the amount owed is paid. The lender will want the transcripts from the IRS, but will typically waive that requirement and get transcripts from the previous two years instead knowing they can request the current year’s transcripts down the road (more on this in a moment). So long as the current year’s tax return copies aren’t showing any income that must be verified through transcripts (such as rental property income, part time business loss/profit), a W2 salaried employee can move forward with only a few hoops to jump through.
  • Everyone Else: This large category would include the self-employed, 1099 employees, and W2 employees that earn more than 25% of their income through commission and bonuses. In this category, not only does underwriting still need proof of filing/proof of extension (and proof of payment if taxes owed on an extension), but now tax transcripts must be made available. While an e-file means the IRS accepts the return instantly, the time between filing, accepting, processing the return, and making a tax transcript available can take several weeks. This timing definitely comes into play when scheduling a closing time on your new home purchase.

Now one thing you may be thinking to get around the transcripts is to file an extension. That works until October 15th! That said, the strategy won’t work if income is needed from the current tax year. It also may still require a P&L from the current tax year for some borrowers.

Planning on buying a home this Spring? Want to make sure there isn’t an unexpected delay on closing due to needing a tax transcript? Contact me today. We’ll make sure the timing is all planned out so we won’t be sitting around waiting for a transcript to become available.

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Loan Application and Prequalification

February 17, 2015

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Almost finished with our first education series. Today we are moving into completing the prequalification process. To show Realtors and home sellers that you are a serious, qualified buyer, you will want to obtain a pre-qualification letter. This letter from your lender shows that you have been prequalified to purchase a home up to a certain price point. When you get prequalified, you are basically completing a loan application. Here are the details.

To contact any of us at Dunwoody Mortgage Services, click here!

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FHA 203k Streamline

July 15, 2014

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Over the past couple of months, I’ve closed a couple 203k streamline loans. I figured now is a good time to talk more about the program itself.

The 203k Streamline loan rehabilitation loan from FHA that allows a borrower (purchase or refinance) to put a little bit of “tender loving care” into a home that needs some updating. There are two versions of this loan. Let me talk about both so there is no confusion.

The first version is simply called the FHA 203k loan. There is no cap on the amount of work that can be done to the home (so long as the home appraises high enough). The borrower can also make structural changes to the home. This loan program takes a longer time to get through underwriting and may require multiple appraisals. This adds up to making it a 45-60 day closing time frame.

A quicker way is using the FHA 203k streamline program. The Streamline version has a cap on the amount of work that can be done. The program also requires a 10% contingency reserve in case the work goes over budget. The cap is $35,000, and 10% of that amount is $3,500. Since almost every one chooses to finance the 10% contingency reserve, that leaves roughly $31,500 for the renovations. Once the work is complete, any excess funds left over in the contingency reserve will be deducted from the loan amount.

The advantage of using the Streamline version is it allows for a quick closing time (around 30-40 days), and an easier time through underwriting. The main drawback is the cap on the amount of money that can be used for renovations.

Here are some bullet points about the FHA 203k Streamline:

  • allows up to $35,000 worth of work that can be done on the home (roughly $31,500 if financing the 10% contingency reserve)
  • the Streamline program allows for a variety of items to be repaired/replaced/updated (roof, windows, siding, flooring, fixtures, appliances, HVAC, etc.).
  • the Streamline program will not allow any structural changes to the home. This means walls cannot be taken out to open up the floor plan.
  • other allowable improvements can include mold remediation, lead-based paint stabilization, septic system repair/replacement
  • borrowers can choose to add exterior decks or patios
  • money can also be used to modify a home for persons with disabilities

As you can read, there are a lot of advantages and goals that can be accomplished using the 203k streamline loan. If you are buying a property in the state of Georgia, and would like to know more, contact me. We can talk about the details of the program and see if the FHA 203k Streamline loan will fit your needs.

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