Posts Tagged ‘mortgage insurance’

Geographic Income Limits for Home Ready Program

May 1, 2017


One potentially limiting aspect of the Home Ready program is that income limits are specified by census tract.  (Notice I said “potentially.”  We will get back to that point very soon.)  To qualify for the program, the borrower’s income must be less than or equal to the income limit set for the geographic area of the subject property.  Fannie Mae specifies and publishes the geographic income limits as part of the program.  Many areas in Metro Atlanta have an annual income cap of $67,200, but there are many other areas that do not have an income limit.  Now back to the word “potentially.”  If the home you want to buy lies in a no-income-limit area, you could make a million dollars per year or even per month and still qualify for a Home Ready loan for that house.

Two key points to remember here:  First of all, the income limits are based the subject property’s location, so you can have varying income limits in different parts of the same county.  In fact, the eligibility maps go down to the street level, which means that houses on one side of a street could carry a $67,200 income limit and houses on the other side of the same street could have no income limit.  Secondly, the income limits apply only to borrowers on the loan.  If two employed people plan to live in the home, but only one of you is on the loan, then the other occupant’s income does not count toward the income limit.  Of course that means that the sole borrower must qualify for the loan using his or her income only.   

So how can you determine whether you qualify for the Home Ready program’s low down payment / low-interest rate / low mortgage insurance benefits?  You can call me at Dunwoody Mortgage!!  We will first discuss your income and the geographic area where you want to buy.  I can look up the area online and determine whether your income qualifies for Home Ready in that area.  If you meet the geographic income limits, we will complete your loan application, pull your credit report, and run your application through our Automated Underwriting System (“AUS”).  The AUS findings will then determine if you do qualify for Home Ready’s great benefits. 

Buying a house in Georgia and curious whether you can obtain a Home Ready loan?  Give me a call and we will review Home Ready and your other loan options.  Don’t think you will qualify?  We at Dunwoody Mortgage have secured loans for many customers who initially thought they would not qualify.  Don’t assume you cannot win loan approval!  Call me and let’s discuss your situation.  We might just surprise you!! 

 

 

 

LPMI Loans – Things to consider

May 7, 2015

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

Continuing a series on LPMI loans, or Lender Paid Mortgage Insurance. Last time I introduced LPMI loans. Today, I want to focus on two things to consider when deciding between using a conventional loan with monthly mortgage insurance OR using a LPMI loan.

#1. Credit – I bet you could have guessed this one! With a higher credit score, the impact to the interest rate is decreased. That said, the lower the credit score, the more the interest rate will be increased.

Remember how LPMI loans work – the borrower won’t pay a monthly PMI payment, but to do so, they are agreeing to a higher interest rate. How much higher? Let’s take a look at two examples of a $300,000 purchase price with 5% down. That gives us a loan amount of $285,000 on a 30 year fixed rate loan.

– 760+ Credit Score: the interest rate on the LPMI loan is 0.375% higher. While the mortgage payment is higher, when you factor is NOT making a monthly mortgage insurance payment, the LPMI loan is lower by about $65 per month.
– Under 720 Credit Score: this time, the net total payment is about $30 less going with the LPMI option. The drawback is the increase to the interest rate, which is 0.750% higher going with the LPMI loan.

The lower payment with the LPMI loan is great, but having the interest rate increased that month is tough to swallow (at least it is to me). The moral of the story is this – an LPMI loan may make more sense for those with excellent credit.

#2. Down Payment – the more money that is put down at the time of the purchase will lower the impact to the interest rate when using an LPMI loan. For example, let’s look at a 5% down payment versus a 15% down payment on our $300,000 purchase price.

– 5% down: it would take about 9 years for monthly PMI to fall off making the minimum monthly payment.
– 15% down: it would take a little over 4 years for monthly PMI to fall off the loan.

The borrower may have the lower monthly payment using an LPMI loan, but why go with the higher rate if the monthly PMI will fall off in only a few years. With an LPMI loan, you are stuck with a higher rate for the life of the loan. The monthly MI payment may result in a higher mortgage payment for a little while, but when the PMI falls off, you’ve got a lower monthly payment. The moral of the story is this – an LPMI loan makes more sense when making a smaller down payment.

How to decide? Tune in next time when we ask the question that helps to decide which option is best for you!

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LPMI Loans – What are they?

May 5, 2015

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

LPMI loans, or Lender Paid Mortgage Insurance, is a loan program that does not require a borrower to make monthly mortgage insurance payments regardless of the size of the down payment. A borrower can make a 3%, 5%, etc. down payment and not make monthly mortgage insurance payments.

Sound too good to go be true? Maybe. There is a catch. In exchange for not making a monthly mortgage insurance payment, the borrower agrees to a higher interest rate on the loan. The lender takes that higher interest rate and purchases a onetime up-front mortgage insurance premium at closing – thus Lender Paid mortgage insurance.

While the lender is technically paying the mortgage insurance, the borrower is really paying it through a higher rate. Does it make sense to use a LPMI loan?

If the goal is a lower payment, the answer is “yes.” When using an LPMI loan, the monthly payment will be lower than having a loan with a lower interest rate but paying monthly mortgage insurance.

Next time, I’ll discuss a couple of items to evaluate when considering a LPMI loan. In the meantime, if you’d like to know more about it, contact me today. I can help get you started on the path to home ownership.

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FHA lowering mortgage insurance

January 13, 2015

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

Finally, FHA mortgage insurance becomes more reasonable (and competitive) when compared to conventional loans. As recently posted on this blog, FHA mortgage insurance has been priced so high that it rarely made sense to consider using an FHA loan.

FHA mortgage insurance still has the one-time upfront premium, and is permanent if making less than a 10% down payment, but at least the monthly mortgage insurance payment is closer. Let’s take a look at how the new numbers compare to one another.

  • FHA – the monthly mortgage insurance rate is dropping from 1.35% to 0.85%. Using our same example of a $250,000 purchase price, the total loan amount would be close to $245,500. If you take 0.85% of that amount, you get $2,087, which is $174 per month.
  • Conventional – assuming the buyer’s credit score is 720+, the same $250,000 purchase price with 5% down would give us a monthly payment of $122 for mortgage insurance. When you take into consideration the fact that FHA loans have a lower interest rate, the difference in the total payment between the two is not much at all.

The buyers who could benefit the most from this are ones looking to make as small of a down payment as possible.

  • The 3% conventional loan is only available to first time home buyers. With only a 3.5% down payment, a buyer would qualify to purchase the home and not get hammered on the monthly mortgage insurance payment since FHA has lowered the monthly amount so much.
  • On the flip side, let’s say it is a first time homebuyer and they’d qualify for a 3% down conventional loan. The FHA loan may still be more attractive since the monthly mortgage insurance payment for an FHA loan is now lower than the monthly mortgage insurance payment for a 3% down conventional loan. Also, the interest rate would be lower on the FHA loan.

That is a lot to consider, which is why you should consult a professional who can ask you questions about your purchase, find out how long you plan to stay in the home, and if you plan on aggressively paying down the loan balance. The answers will ensure you choose the right loan for you situation.

Whether a first time home buyer or an experienced buyer, if you are buying in the state of Georgia, I’m happy to help. Contact me today to get started and we’ll get you into your new home.

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FHA Mortgage Insurance

December 16, 2014

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

In a recent post, I mentioned how buying a home using a conventional loan with a 3% down payment helps avoid ridiculously high mortgage insurance payments associated with FHA loans. What makes FHA mortgage insurance payments more expensive than conventional loans?

Due to the housing and foreclosure crisis, FHA continually increased their monthly mortgage insurance payments to help cover their losses from FHA insured homes that went into foreclosure. Prior to the crisis, the monthly mortgage insurance rate was 0.50% of the loan amount per year. After 5 straight years of increases, it is now at 1.35% of the loan amount per year.

Great. What does that mean?

Let’s take a look at some numbers comparing FHA mortgage insurance to a conventional loan with 5% down and also a conventional loan with 3% down.

  • FHA – on a $250,000 purchase price, the total loan amount for an FHA loan would be close to $245,500. If you take 1.35% of that loan amount, you get $3,313 for the year. Divide that out by 12 months, and the monthly mortgage insurance payment is about $276 per month.
  • Conventional 5% down – assuming the buyer’s credit score is 720+, the same $250,000 purchase price with 5% down would give us a monthly payment of $122 for mortgage insurance. The FHA loan is more than double that amount per month.
  • Conventional 3% down – again, assuming a 720+ credit score and a $250,000 purchase price with 3% down, the monthly mortgage insurance payment would be $222. That is about 25% less per month compared to an FHA loan.

The monthly mortgage insurance payments for conventional loans can be noticeably lower than FHA loans. I haven’t even got into the fact that all FHA loans come with an upfront mortgage insurance premium of 1.75% of the loan rolled into the loan amount (about $4,200 rolled into the loan amount on a $250,000 purchase price). Nor have I covered how, in most cases, FHA mortgage insurance is permanent.

I encourage my clients, when they qualify, to use a conventional loan to purchase a home because conventional mortgage insurance is typically lower per month, there is no upfront premium, and the mortgage insurance is not permanent. That said, sometimes an FHA loan is still the way to go.

Looking to buy a home in the state of Georgia but are unsure if you should use a conventional or FHA loan? Contact me today to get started. I’ll go through the pros and cons of each, and we’ll run the numbers to see which option makes the most sense for your specific situation.

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Mortgage Insurance

November 20, 2014

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

Last time our videos focused on the monthly mortgage payment. Today, we will focus on something that could be part of a monthly mortgage payment – mortgage insurance. There are a lot of components that go into mortgage insurance. Watch the video to learn more about it!

To contact any of us at Dunwoody Mortgage Services, click here!

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FHA changes begin April 1st

February 12, 2013

blog-author-clayjeffreys2

As you may have heard OR read on this blog, FHA announced changes to their loans. Those changes take place on all case numbers assigned on or after April 1, 2013. Does this mean you need to be closed on a home by the end of March.

In the words of Lee Corso – not so fast my friend!

lee-corso

The changes that increase the monthly mortgage insurance rate AND make the mortgage insurance permanent are for all loans with case numbers assigned by April 1st. That doesn’t mean you need to be closed by that date. Ideally, you need to be under contract by Monday, March 25, 2013 so your lender can order your case number. Under this scenario, you should have a case number before April 1st.

Typically it takes 24-48 hours to get a case number back, but there could be a rush on case number orders due to the April 1st deadline. To ensure you get a case number assigned before April 1, 2013, be under contract by March 25th. Have your lender order the case number ASAP, and you should have it back by the end of the week.

This means you don’t have to find a home and be closed in roughly 45 days from now. What it does mean is you have six weeks to get prequalified, find a home, make an offer, and get under contract. You can close after April 1st and still get the current mortgage insurance terms and guidelines for your FHA loan.

Looking to buy a home in the state of Georgia? Contact me today, and I can help y0u get started with the prequalification process.

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FHA changes officially announced

January 31, 2013

blog-author-clayjeffreys2

As I mentioned earlier this month, FHA has indeed announced changes to their guidelines. While FHA was approved by Congress to increase their monthly mortgage insurance rates by roughly 60%, the actual increase wasn’t that severe. Don’t get too excited though. There is one change that isn’t going to be very popular at all.

The announced changes include:

  • Monthly mortgage insurance for borrowers making the minimum down payment will see the monthly mortgage insurance rates increase from 1.25% to 1.35%. On a $200,000 that works out to about a $17 per month increase.
  • The biggest change is that mortgage insurance will be required for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance will no longer fall off of the loan once you have 22% equity. You’ll pay monthly mortgage insurance for 30 years on a 30 year fixed FHA loan unless you make a 10% down payment when you buy the home (if you can make a 10% down payment, you more likely to be better off going conventional).
  • Borrowers with a credit score less than 620 and a debt to income ratio higher than 43% will require manual underwriting for approval along with a letter from the lender explaining why this borrower was approved. Individuals looking to buy a home that fall into this category will be hard pressed to find a lender who will process their loan.

As expected, these changes make conventional loans look way more attractive. For example, let’s assume you are looking to buy a home and have a credit score 720 or more. With today’s PMI rates, the monthly mortgage insurance on FHA loans is twice as much than conventional loans with a 5% down payment.

Let’s use a $200,000 purchase price again and compare FHA and conventional loans:

  • The FHA down payment is only $7,000, but the monthly mortgage insurance is $220 per month.
  • The conventional loan down payment is a little higher at $10,000, but the monthly mortgage insurance is $107. That is a savings of $113 per month (over $1,300 per year).

Why the changes? It is twofold. First, FHA is looking to raise money because their reserves are exhausted. Increasing mortgage insurance and requiring it for the life of the loan would help replenish their reserves that have been severely hurt by the foreclosure crisis over the past few years.

The second reason is to reduce the number of FHA loans they insure. By making it more expensive to use an FHA loan, it will steer borrowers to conventional loans – which is the goal of the government so they do not have to insure as many mortgages as they are currently funding.

The moral of the story – if you are looking to buy a home using an FHA loan, you want to get started and closed before these changes take effect. If you are buying in the state of Georgia, I can help you get started with the prequalification process today. Don’t delay as these changes are coming!

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Coming soon – FHA changes

January 7, 2013

blog-author-clayjeffreys2
I’m sure no one saw this one coming (lots of sarcasm here).

For the past several years, FHA has annually increased their monthly mortgage insurance. Toward the end of 2012, as posted here on this blog, FHA was given the approval to dramatically increase their monthly mortgage insurance. It seems the probable increase isn’t going to be that bad.

The actual proposed changes include increasing the monthly mortgage insurance from 1.25% of the loan amount annually to 1.35%. That isn’t a huge change. The BIG change is this…

Currently FHA mortgage insurance falls off once a borrower has paid at least 60 mortgage insurance payments AND has 22% equity in the home. Moving forward FHA loans could require mortgage insurance for the life of the loan. If approved, it doesn’t matter how much equity you have in your home, you’ll be paying mortgage insurance as long as you have the mortgage.

That is a dramatic change. Why would FHA be considering a change this dramatic? As with most things in life, it all has to do with money.

Also discussed on this blog, FHA exhausted its reserves toward the end of 2012. This doesn’t mean FHA can’t function. What it means is they don’t have the reserves the government say they “should” have  based on the amount of FHA loans they have financed. FHA is still funding loans and running its day-to-day operation. They are just lacking reserves.

Well, one way to get rid of this problem is making mortgage insurance payments never go away. That would certainly help. It isn’t official yet, but once FHA officially announces their changes, I’ll be here to update you.

In the meantime, if you are thinking of buying a home and needing to use an FHA loan to do it, now is the time to get going. We don’t know the exact changes, but we know the terms will be worse than they are today. If you are buying a home in Georgia, contact me to get the prequalification process underway.

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Apply now for FHA streamline refinance with lower mortgage insurance rates

May 21, 2012

Shortly after FHA announced their new (and lower) mortgage insurance rates for streamline refinances in March, I quickly jumped onto The Mortgage Blog to update the millions and millions of loyal readers of this blog on the coming changes. The recap the changes:

  • Lower mortgage insurance rates on FHA loans are for streamline refinances only
  • Homeowners who got their current FHA loan prior to June 1, 2009 are eligible for the lower premiums
  • The upfront premium is only 0.01% of the loan amount (compared to 1.75% of the loan amount for all other FHA loans)
  • The monthly premium is based on 0.55% of the loan amount on an annual basis (versus 1.25% for all other FHA loans)
  • FHA streamline refinances do not require an appraisal

In short, homeowners must make their mortgage payments on time, and got their FHA loan prior to June 1, 2009 to qualify.

If you qualify for the new FHA Streamline refinance mortgage insurance, you can get started now with the loan application. You can complete an application, lock in your rate, and get started with the loan process. While you can’t close on the loan until you get an FHA case number on June 11, 2012, taking this approach will put you ahead and the game once June 11 rolls around. This approach definitely beats staring at a calendar hoping time passes by faster.

George Clooney stars in “Men who stare at Calendars”

Let’s review… get started now OR sit around and stare at the calendar. What do you want to do? If your home is in the state of Georgia, I can help you get started!