Posts Tagged ‘minimum down payment loan programs’

Good News for (Some) Home Buyers!

July 16, 2020

As a loan officer, I really like the Home Possible and Home Ready conventional loan programs.  For eligible borrowers, these programs offer discounted interest rate pricing and discounted mortgage insurance premiums.  To qualify, home buyers must make a down payment between 3% and 20% and complete an online homeownership class.  Borrowers must also earn an income of 80% or less than the area median income for the census tract where they will buy a home.

I think these programs are such good deals that I have recommended (1) borrowers who planned to make a 20%+ down payment actually make less than a 20% down payment to qualify for the lower rate and (2) spouses or domestic partners put only one person on the loan application to keep income lower to qualify for the discounts (that’s perfectly legal and within guidelines, by the way!!)  The discounts are especially powerful for people wanting to buy condominiums, as these programs allow the buyer to avoid the expensive “condominium price adjustment” in the interest rate calculation.  The Mortgage Blog has covered these programs in the past.

So, what’s the good news?  On July 12, Freddie Mac updated its Home Possible Eligibility Tool to reflect the new 2020 area median income limits issued by the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FIFA).  Approximately 87% of counties will experience AMI increases in 2020.  That means that more home buyers can now qualify for these great loan programs.

I checked the tool for some addresses in the Atlanta Metro Area.  Before July 12, the Home Possible annual income limit in these areas was $63,360.  Now the annual income limit is higher at $65,760.  I also checked Fannie Mae’s Home Ready website and found the same adjustment.  While the income increases are not huge, every little bit helps, right?  Home buyers earning $64,000 to $65,000 now can take advantage of these great programs, whereas they could not before July 12.

I recently talked with a first-time home buyer.  She said another lender suggested she get an FHA mortgage.  I recommended that with her 740 credit score and qualifying income, the Home Ready / Home Possible programs would be much better for her.  She could get a similar interest rate with a 3% down payment, and she could avoid the FHA up-front mortgage insurance, which would cost her over $4,500.  She agreed with me.

Do you know someone who wants to buy their first home in Georgia?  They need to find a mortgage lender who will explore all loan options to find the loan that best fits their own unique situation.  Tell your friend or coworker to call me.  I’ll make sure we structure the loan and their application to take advantage of the best loan program available.

COVID Could Negatively Impact the Rental Market

June 18, 2020

It’s fascinating to see studies about how the pandemic could impact the future residential real estate market.  The latest Mortgage Blog post noted that many city dwellers are now considering a move to the suburbs.  Here’s another impact:  A recent renters survey showed that 35.9% of all renters say they likely will not renew their lease, while another 38% are not sure or are somewhat likely to renew their lease.  Most striking is that 41.6% of renters who pay $1,750 or more per month say they will likely not renew their lease.  The article states that apartment fitness centers, pools, and clubhouses closed due to the pandemic contributed to this renter sentiment.

As someone who likes growing my net worth, I must say this survey makes sense to me.  At today’s historically low interest rates, it is possible for someone in the Atlanta area to buy a $300,000 home with a 5% down payment, and have a mortgage payment of only about $1,750 per month.  (This assumes a 3.5% interest rate.)  With a monthly rent payment, the entire amount is an expense.  Renters do not build wealth from their residence.  But a home buyer begins building her net worth with her first mortgage payment.  For the scenario mentioned here, the very first mortgage payment includes $448.53 of principal, or equity in the home.  So only $1,302 is an expense.  That seems like a better use of money to me.

And, given recent home price appreciation, it is reasonable to assume that an owner’s home will appreciate over time, building additional wealth.  So home owners build wealth with appreciation over time and with each payment.  My question is, “Why would someone pay $1,750 in monthly rent when they could own a $300,000 home instead?”  I suppose I can understand if people love their apartment’s amenities or if they don’t want to deal with home maintenance issues.

But many people believe myths that make them think they cannot buy, when they actually can.  One myth is that a buyer must make a 20% down payment.  I have closed many mortgages where the home buyer made only a 3% down payment.  And I’ve closed VA loans where the borrower paid $0 down.  To fund 3% down payment a buyer can get a gift from a relative or perhaps borrow from a 401K account.  Another myth people believe is that they must have “great” credit.  Even in the pandemic world, we can close mortgages for people with a 620 credit score.  And there are ways to improve a credit score over time.

Would you like to grow your wealth every month with homeownership in Georgia instead of making an expense-only rent payment?  If yes, contact me today.  We can start planning now to help you buy a home as soon as possible.

 

 

How Relatives Can Assist Home Buyers…

April 16, 2020

A recent survey of 1,045 adults found that 77% of the Gen Z and Millennial cohorts expect their parents’ financial assistance when purchasing their first home.  Of the young people surveyed, 38% expected help funding a down payment, 31% expected parents to co-sign on their mortgage, and 24% percent expected help covering closing costs.  From the lender’s perspective, this is all very doable as long as the needed documentation is delivered and all other lending criteria (e.g., credit scores and debt to income ratios) are carefully met.  Documenting financial assistance from relatives can be challenging if the borrower does not plan in advance, so here are some suggested “best practices” for home buyers who expect this help.

The “gifts of cash” concept covers help covering both down payments and closing costs, as mentioned in the survey.  Parents and other relatives can give cash to cover all aspects of the buyer’s cash to close – down payment, closing costs, and prepaid escrow.  To be approved, such gifts need to come from documented relatives, which includes parents, grandparents, siblings, and even aunts and uncles, along with spouses, domestic partners, and fiancés.  From experience, I can report that underwriters will likely not approve gifts from nieces or nephews and not from ex-spouses, as the relationship has been legally terminated.

Underwriters expect gifts to be carefully documented.  This includes a gift letter signed by both giver and buyer.  The letter states that the money given is a gift, and not a loan.  Loans to help buyers are prohibited.  If the giver makes the gift using a check, the underwriter will want to see a copy of the check.  And if the gift occurs before closing, the underwriter will want to see bank statements from the giver and the buyer showing the funds coming out of the giver’s account and into the buyer’s account.  For some loan types, the giver may have to show proof of funds and document the source of any “large deposits” into the giving account.  My preference for conventional loans is to have the giver wire the funds directly to the closing attorney’s escrow account.  When this is done for a conventional loan, the only documentation typically required for the buyer and giver is the gift letter itself.  It’s much simpler and less time consuming, so I recommend this approach when possible.

Relatives and even friends can co-sign mortgages along with the home buyer.  (Yes, friends can co-sign…I recently verified this for a potential client.)  To do this, we combine loan files for the buyer and the co-signer.  As long as the combined file meets all underwriting criteria (credit scores, available cash to close, and combined debt to income ratio), underwriting will approve mortgages including the “non-occupant co-borrower.”

Do you know a young person who wants to end her expense-only monthly rental cost?  Ask her if she is expecting an income tax refund this year.  Then connect her with me.  I’ll help her explore how best to fund a home purchase with that refund and assistance from family, if necessary.

Changes to minimum down payment loans

January 10, 2020

It’s a new year! With a new year, always expect changes in the mortgage industry. This blog discussed some changes last month:

Why stop there?!? We will keep it going for a conventional loan programs with small down payments. I’ll touch base on the new guideline compared to the previous requirements.

NEW: When making less than a 5% down payment on a conventional loan, if all borrower’s on the loan are first time home buyers, one of the borrowers must complete a homeownership education course.

Previously there was no education requirement for those putting less than 5% down to purchase a home. Note if one of the buyers has previously owned a home, then there is no education requirement regardless of the down payment amount.

For those keeping score at home, a “first time home buyer” is defined as anyone who has never owned a home OR has not owned a home in the past three years. If the last home you owned was more than three years ago, then you are now a first time home buyer.

NEW: Home Ready loans no longer require the homeownership education course if one of the occupying buyers has previously owned a home (again, means has owned a home in the past 3 years).

Prior to the change, one borrower had to complete the education course even if they had previously owned a home.

NEW: The homeowner education course is free if the borrower’s use this link – https://educate.frameworkhomeownership.org . Note if using another accepted education course, there may be a non-refundable fee of $75.

Prior to this change, the cost of the course was $75 to everyone regardless of where the course was completed.

New years… new changes… a lot to keep up with… your head spinning? Don’t worry! It is my job to keep up with the changes.

The Spring Market is upon us. If you are ready to get out and purchase a home in 2020, contact me  today. If the property is in Georgia, I can get you ready to make an offer in just a few minutes. You can be well on your way to owning a new home faster than you’d ever expect!

New FHA max loan limit

December 12, 2019

In early December, I mentioned the maximum loan amount for conventional loans will increase from $484,350 to $510,400 in 2020. FHA followed suit and increase their maximum loan amounts.

One thing to remember about the maximum FHA loan amount is the amount varies from county to county. The max loan is based on the average home values in each market. The loan amount range across the US goes from $331,760 to $765,600.

To find your area, you can use the search tool created by HUD. Be sure to change the Limit Year from “CY2019” to “CY2020” in order to see the new maximum amounts.

For the Atlanta metro area, the new maximum FHA loan amount will be $401,350. This is about a 5% increase over the current limit of $379,500. With these increases, a buyer can now purchase a home in metro Atlanta:

As we celebrate the new year, it is also time to celebrate more buying power in the housing market!

Are you thinking about buying a home in 2020? Want to get a head start? I’m already working with clients who are ready to purchase home. The spring market has started! If you are buying a home in the state of Georgia, contact me today. You can be ready to make an offer on a home in no time at all.

Big VA Loan Changes for 2020!

December 12, 2019

Exciting new changes are coming for VA loans that close after January 1, 2020.  These two major changes will make it easier for military veterans to purchase a home.

The first change is that the threshold for VA jumbo loans will rise from $484,350 to $510,400.  This rise aligns with the increase in the conventional conforming loan limit.  This means that the higher VA jumbo interest rates will now apply only to loans exceeding $510,400.

The second change is expected to be 0% down payments on all VA loans.  The VA hasn’t officially released details on their max loans as of this post. Again, the expectation is no down payments will be required on VA loans in 2020.

Until now, veterans will full eligibility could obtain zero down loans on principal amounts only up to the VA jumbo threshold.  So the maximum zero down loan in 2019 is $484,350.  Loan amounts above this threshold have previously required down payments.  I won’t bore you with the complicated calculation now.  The key point is that veterans can now obtain 100% financing on homes priced up to $950,000.

This is a GREAT change for one of my current clients.  My client served for over 10 years, but the military doesn’t pay top dollar.  He and his wife were not able to save much money during his military days.  He recently started a very high paying job in Atlanta.  His credit score is over 800.  With his strong income, his debt to income ratio on a $750,000 home would fall well within VA underwriting guidelines.  He can make the monthly payments and he has a strong record of paying his bills on time.  He just has not been able to save for a significant down payment with his prior military pay.  Starting January 1, he will be able to buy that $750,000 home with zero down!  He is the “poster-child” for this VA loan change.

Do you know a military veteran here in Georgia?  Perhaps you see the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps stickers on her car in the office parking lot.  When she complains about her commute, ask her how her life would change if she cut her commute by 30 minutes each way.  Then introduce her to me.  I’ll work to get her a great deal on a VA loan, taking advantages of the benefits she earned through her military service.  A new home closer to the office will make her life much better.

American Homebuying Power Grows

September 26, 2019

Overall economic circumstances keep improving for potential homebuyers.  First American’s Real House Price Index (RHPI) shows that Americans’ homebuying power increased consistently from January through July 2019.  The index tracks single-family home price changes adjusted for mortgage interest rate changes and personal income changes.

Mortgage interest rates trended downward during the first half of 2019, and they are even lower now compared to mid-year.  First American reported mortgage rates in January were 4.5%, and rates moved into the 3’s over the summer.  Average household income increased over the same time period.

Decreasing mortgage rates combined with increasing household incomes provide a double boost to Americans’ home buying power.  The Index’s “house-buying power” for consumers increased roughly 10% from January through July.  According to First American’s Chief Economist, Mark Fleming, “House-buying power is at the highest it’s been since we began tracking it in 1991.”

That means now is a great time to buy a home!  Even though home prices have been increasing, the decrease in mortgage rates coupled with household income growth make right now the best time to buy a home in almost 30 years, based on the RHPI measures.

Do you have a Georgia friend who complains about a landlord who won’t fix problems?  Let them know that their homebuying power is stronger than it has been in decades, and connect them with me.  I’ll help them obtain the best home mortgage for their unique situation as quickly as possible.  I’ll help your friend take advantage of today’s really low mortgage rates before they increase to 2018 levels or even higher.  Together, we will fire their unresponsive landlord!

Which Type of Mortgage To Use – Scenario 1

August 13, 2019

Now that everyone understands the basics of FHA and conventional loans, let’s do a buyer comparison. Both Jack and Diane want to purchase a $300,000 home. They both have $11,000 (3.7%) for the down payment and qualifying credit scores of 680 for Jack and 795 for Diane.

With Jack’s 680 credit score, his monthly payment for a conventional loan (principal, interest, and mortgage insurance “MI”) would be $1,820.82.  For a FHA loan, his payment would be $1,563.19. There’s no comparison. For Jack, the better deal is the FHA mortgage, even though it has the draw backs of the up-front mortgage insurance and the permanent monthly mortgage insurance payment.

With Diane’s 795 credit score, her monthly payment for a conventional loan would only be $1,582.61. Her FHA loan payment would be $1,542.47.  In this case, Diane is also better off, at least initially, with the FHA loan. One thing to keep in mind is the MI premium. If Diane chooses the FHA loan, that premium is permanent (assuming Congress does not change the law). If she chooses the conventional loan, the insurance will eventually be cancelled, dropping her payment to $1,442. The key question for Diane is, “How long will you stay in the home?” If less than 5 years, Diane’s best bet is the FHA loan. If longer than 5 years, Diane may want to consider the conventional loan.

Notice the FHA payments for these examples. They differ by only about $21 even though the credit scores are drastically different (680 versus 795). This shows why FHA is better for those making a purchase with lower credit scores. The buyer doesn’t see as steep of an increase in their payment.

In the next blog post, we will make the same comparison with a 10% down payment.

Does your friend Scott talk about buying a house?  Does he understand which loan program is best for him?  If not, have Scott contact me. We Dunwoody Mortgage professionals understand the details of these mortgage programs, and we coach our buyers to make the best decision given their circumstances.  Often, with a slight change to their home purchase situation (change of down payment, paying down a credit card balance, etc.), we can help our clients save money with a better interest rate or a lower mortgage insurance cost.  Home buyers should consider all options before buying, and Dunwoody Mortgage offers the service and knowledge to help home buyers make the best decision possible.

Types of Mortgages – Conventional

July 30, 2019

Now let’s take a look at conventional mortgage details.  (Click here to review FHA loan details.  And here is a link to the Home Ready program changes.)

In general, conventional loans are less forgiving of credit issues than are FHA loans.  Conventional loans require longer wait times after derogatory credit events like foreclosure or bankruptcy.  And the borrower’s credit score has a much greater impact on conventional loan pricing versus FHA loans.  The lower one’s credit score, the higher the interest rate.  In some cases, a credit score 100 points lower could cause the borrower’s interest rate to increase by almost one percentage point.

Ultimately, this makes conventional mortgages less attractive to borrowers with lower credit scores and more attractive to those with higher credit scores.

Conventional loans do not require up-front mortgage insurance, but private mortgage insurance (“PMI”) is required for down payments less than 20%.  PMI rates vary based on the borrower’s credit score and down payment.  For the same loan amount, the monthly PMI will be dramatically different for a 690 credit score borrower making a 5% down payment vs. a 780 credit score borrower making a 15% down payment.  PMI is not permanent.  It automatically terminates when the borrower’s loan balance reaches 78% of the original contract price or appraised value (whichever is lower).  And, in certain circumstances, the borrower can request PMI cancellation prior to reaching the 78% threshold.

Borrowers can obtain a conventional loan with a minimum 3% down payment.  This often only makes sense when the borrower’s credit score is 720 or higher.  With a lower score, the PMI cost for a 3% down loan can get pretty expensive.  We often recommend that conventional buyers make a 5% or more down payment to keep PMI costs lower.

Another advantage of conventional loans is the maximum loan amount.  While FHA caps out at a purchase price of around $390,000 using the minimum down payment, conventional loans can go higher.  How much higher?  How about a $500,000 purchase price with a 3% down payment.  That is about 25% higher than the FHA maximum.

In the next posts, we will compare some hypothetical home buyer scenarios to determine which loan is best – conventional or FHA.  Do you know someone who wants to buy a Georgia home?  Please refer them to me.   We Dunwoody Mortgage professionals ask important questions to determine if we can help our clients make slight changes (down payment amount, paying down a credit card balance, etc.) that help them save money with a better interest rate and / or lower PMI premium.  We work hard to deliver excellent service and pricing to our customers, and our consistently positive reviews show our clients are pleased with our work.

 

Types of Mortgages – FHA

July 23, 2019

Given recent mortgage program changes, now is a good time to review the pros and cons of the major loan programs and when borrower circumstances favor one specific loan program.  In the last few years, many of our clients have used the conventional Home Ready program.   Without Home Ready, many of these buyers would have used FHA loans.  Given the Home Ready changes, we expect more future buyers to use FHA loans.

So let’s talk about FHA loans!

  • In the metro-Atlanta area, buyers can purchase homes up to about $390,000 using a minimum down payment (3.5%) FHA loan.  That is a lot of home!
  • Relative to conventional mortgages, FHA loans are generally more forgiving of credit “issues.”  This means lower credit score borrowers will most likely get a better FHA interest rate versus a conventional loan.
  • FHA allows for lower credit scores and shorter wait times following derogatory credit events, such as foreclosure or bankruptcy.  Borrowers typically need a 620 score to qualify.  Depending on other borrower details, Dunwoody Mortgage may be able to close loans where the borrower’s credit score is as low as 580.

Both FHA and conventional loans require monthly mortgage insurance “MI” for down payments less than 20%.  For FHA, the monthly premium is a flat 0.85% of the loan amount.  Conventional loans determine the premium based on the borrower’s credit score and down payment.  FHA loans also have an up-front mortgage insurance premium.  FHA monthly MI is permanent if the down payment is less than 10%.  Note that Congress is now considering a bill to automatically cancel FHA MI similar to how conventional loans cancel the insurance.  More to come on this story.

In the next post, we will review conventional loan details.  For now, if you know someone looking to buy a Georgia home, please refer them to me.  We Dunwoody Mortgage professionals understand the key loan program details and we coach our buyers to make the best decision given their circumstances.  We can help our clients find ways to lower interest and mortgage insurance costs.  We have a strong record full of very positive customer reviews.