Posts Tagged ‘minimum credit score requirements’

Types of Mortgages – FHA

July 23, 2019

Given recent mortgage program changes, now is a good time to review the pros and cons of the major loan programs and when borrower circumstances favor one specific loan program.  In the last few years, many of our clients have used the conventional Home Ready program.   Without Home Ready, many of these buyers would have used FHA loans.  Given the Home Ready changes, we expect more future buyers to use FHA loans.

So let’s talk about FHA loans!

  • In the metro-Atlanta area, buyers can purchase homes up to about $390,000 using a minimum down payment (3.5%) FHA loan.  That is a lot of home!
  • Relative to conventional mortgages, FHA loans are generally more forgiving of credit “issues.”  This means lower credit score borrowers will most likely get a better FHA interest rate versus a conventional loan.
  • FHA allows for lower credit scores and shorter wait times following derogatory credit events, such as foreclosure or bankruptcy.  Borrowers typically need a 620 score to qualify.  Depending on other borrower details, Dunwoody Mortgage may be able to close loans where the borrower’s credit score is as low as 580.

Both FHA and conventional loans require monthly mortgage insurance “MI” for down payments less than 20%.  For FHA, the monthly premium is a flat 0.85% of the loan amount.  Conventional loans determine the premium based on the borrower’s credit score and down payment.  FHA loans also have an up-front mortgage insurance premium.  FHA monthly MI is permanent if the down payment is less than 10%.  Note that Congress is now considering a bill to automatically cancel FHA MI similar to how conventional loans cancel the insurance.  More to come on this story.

In the next post, we will review conventional loan details.  For now, if you know someone looking to buy a Georgia home, please refer them to me.  We Dunwoody Mortgage professionals understand the key loan program details and we coach our buyers to make the best decision given their circumstances.  We can help our clients find ways to lower interest and mortgage insurance costs.  We have a strong record full of very positive customer reviews.


The mysterious case of home ownership

July 9, 2019

Home buyers continue to make assumptions (most of which are bad) when it comes to buying a home. Meaning, the options for education for buying a home are not as good as they should be.

That is why you have The Mortgage Blog!

This misinformation is undoubtedly holding some back from even looking to try and purchase a home. Let’s take a look at a recent survey by Fannie Mae to see some of the false assumptions buyers have about purchasing a home:

  • most buyers assume the minimum credit score is higher than what is actually required to qualify
  • most buyers assume the down payment is higher than what is actually required as a minimum down payment
  • few home buyers are aware of low down payment programs such as Fannie Mae Home Ready requiring only 3% down

Under these assumptions, many potential buyers assume home ownership isn’t even an option and therefor do not do any further investigating into possibilities of buying a home.

The Mortgage Blog has covered all of these topics and more:

The Mortgage Blog has your back! Reading over these, one will learn a large down payment is not needed to buy a home (as little as 3% down on a conventional loan and 3.5% on an FHA loan), perfect credit is not required (down to 620 on FHA and conventional and sometimes as low as 580 on FHA), and there are programs out there for first time home buyers.

Been wanting to own a home but confused at all of the misinformation out there? Just want a straight answer or two? Contact me! I will be happy to answer your questions about home ownership. If you are looking to buy in the state of Georgia, I can get you prequalified and on your way to owning a home!

Taking on the spring market

April 16, 2019

It is definitely spring, and the housing market is heating up. It is time to take advantage of new homes on the market. What am I seeing this year that is different from last year:

  1. Mortgage rates are lower this year than they were last year at this time. Right now, they are lower by roughly a half point!
  2. The rise in home values has slowed each month for the past 10 months. The combination of slowing home values and a drop in mortgage rates gives buyers roughly 6% more buying power today than they had this time last year.
  3. I am seeing sellers begin to give money toward closing costs. Don’t read this statement as sellers are paying ALL closing costs again. What I mean is instead of every purchase contract I see where the seller is giving $0 to the buyer for closing costs, now I am seeing contracts with the seller giving a few thousand to the buyer.
  4. Homes sitting on the market for sale for too long are now getting price reductions. Last year, homes weren’t sitting that long and few were getting price reductions.

What to make of all this information? While still a seller’s market, the market is softening and buyers have more purchasing power. Now is the time to act!

I know what you may be thinking…

  • I don’t have enough money to put 20% down…  Not a problem. Did you know a $500,000 home can be purchased with about a 3% down payment. While one’s target may not be $500,000, 3% is all it takes to get into a home.
  • My credit isn’t perfect… Again, not a problem. You don’t need perfect credit to purchase a home. Conventional and FHA loans allow for credit scores down to 620, which is below average credit.
  • I just started a new job, so I can’t buy a home… Not necessarily. A new job doesn’t mean someone lost their chance at buying a home. Being able to qualify for a home depends more on how they are paid (W2, hourly, salary, 1099) versus how much they are paid.

Don’t let what you’ve read on the internet get you down. Just because you read it online, or someone in the office break room told you something doesn’t make it true. It is easier to buy a home than many people think. If you are looking to buy a home in Georgia, contact me  today. Let’s get the process started. In just a few minutes, we’ll be well on our way to getting you into a new home.

Credit scores on the rise

September 11, 2018

Some consumers credit scores are going up! A recent overhaul in the way the major credit bureaus factor in negative credit information is prompting millions of consumers’ credit scores to rise. The main reason? The removal of some collection items.

Over the past 12 months, collection items were removed from eight million consumers’ credit reports. The NY Federal Reserve said consumers who had at least one collection item/account removed from their credit reports saw on average an 11-point increase to their scores. Why the change in collection items being part of the credit score? Some collection categories often have mistakes/errors that lower potential buyers credit scores and keep them out of the borrowing market.

The three main bureaus (Equifax, Experian PLC, and TransUnion) all agreed to rework credit reports reports stemming from a 2015 settlement. In the settlement, some of the collection items removed were non-loan related items such as gym memberships, library fines, traffic tickets, and some instances of medical debt. This change would not include credit cards or loan related accounts. Those type of accounts that enter into a collection category will still negatively impact a potential home buyer’s credit score. any firms agreed to remove some non-loan related items that were sent to collection firms, such as gym memberships, library fines, and traffic tickets. They also agreed to strike medical-debt collections that have been paid by a patient’s insurance company. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, those seeing the biggest boost to their credit scores are those with a score in the mid 600s.

This is a great move by the credit bureaus. Sometimes it is easier to prove that one owes money with the account in good standing, and harder to prove one no longer owes a debt. Some debts such as tax liens, credit card collections, back taxes, car/student loans in default, etc. are easier to prove the debt is actually in arrears. Arguing about a library account in a city one may have lived in 5 years ago becomes troubling and difficult to prove. While these accounts aren’t being removed from a credit report/history, they are being ignored when it comes to producing the credit score.

Waiting Periods After Derogatory Credit Items – Bankruptcies

October 30, 2017

In the last post, we looked at how lending guidelines require specific waiting periods for different types of “derogatory items” on a borrower’s credit report.  Then we zeroed in on waiting periods following a property foreclosure.  In this post, we will cover the waiting periods required after bankruptcy filings.  As with foreclosures, the different mortgage types specify different waiting periods.  The waiting periods also vary by the type of bankruptcy filed – Chapter 7 or Chapter 13.

Let’s start with Chapter 7 – the required waiting periods are as follows:

  • FHA – 2 years from the discharge date
  • VA – 2 years from the discharge date
  • Conventional – 4 years from the discharge or dismissal date
  • Jumbo – 7 years from the discharge date

The waiting period calculations get a bit more complicated with Chapter 13 bankruptcy filings.  The Chapter 13 waiting periods are as follows:

  • FHA – 1 year from the start of the payout period, as long as the borrower has made all required payments on time.
  • VA – 2 years from the discharge date, or if the Chapter 13 is in repayment, the Trustee must document satisfactory payment history for 12 months of the payout period and the court must give permission to enter into a mortgage transaction
  • Conventional – 2 years from the discharge date or 4 years from the dismissal date
  • Jumbo – 7 years from the discharge date.

So ultimately the good news here is that you don’t have to wait “forever” to apply for a new mortgage after a bankruptcy – unless of course you want a jumbo loan.  (7 years is a long time to wait.)  As always, FHA and VA loans are more “forgiving” of past credit problems.

Do you or someone you know have a bankruptcy in your past and now want to buy a home?  It may be possible to make it happen.  Be sure to work with a lender who will ask detailed questions and help coach you to the best option for your specific situation.  I’ve recently closed loans for multiple clients “bouncing back” after a bankruptcy.  It brings joy to close that loan and help my clients reach another financial milestone following their struggles.  Call me at Dunwoody Mortgage and let’s determine the best option for you or whomever you know with a past bankruptcy.

 

Mortgage life after a derogatory credit event

February 14, 2017

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An unforeseen event takes place… a medical event, job loss, divorce, death of a spouse… before you know it, bills are piling up and they never seem to end. Eventually this buildup could result in a bankruptcy, foreclosure, short sale… a major derogatory credit event. Once it is over, will you ever be able to buy a home again?

The answer is yes. During the housing boom, someone could apply for a loan the day after completing a bankruptcy. Let’s just say guidelines are different now, but not insurmountable. Most people assume there is a 7-year wait after something as big as a bankruptcy or foreclosure. That is true if you are looking to qualify for a Jumbo loan (any loan amount over $424,100). On the other hand, if you are looking to buy a home for say $350,000 with the minimum down payment, is it still a 7-year wait?

No, definitely not.

This post will focus on conventional loans. Next time, we’ll discuss government loans.

What are the waiting periods? Using today’s guidelines*:

  • Chapter 7 bankruptcy: requires a 4-year wait
  • Chapter 13 bankruptcy: requires a 2-year wait from the discharge date, but 4 years from the dismissal date if the Chapter 13 bankruptcy application isn’t accepted by the courts
  • Multiple bankruptcy filings: 5-year wait
  • Foreclosure: 7 years unless the home was included in a bankruptcy filing. In that case, it drops from 7 to 4 years
  • Other: There is a 4-year wait for a deed-in-lieu of foreclosure, short sale, or the sale of a home during the foreclosure process

*Those are Fannie Mae guidelines. Technically, Freddie Mac does not have minimum waiting period. Underwriting goes by the Automated Underwriting Services findings from Freddie Mac. That said, the “findings” often mirror the guidelines of Fannie Mae. 

In only one of these instances is there a 7-year waiting period. That would be if there was a foreclosure on a home that was not included in a bankruptcy. In every other situation, one could be ready to purchase a home much sooner than 7 years. Government loans are much more forgiving, but conventional loans are to be used in situations where a borrower doesn’t qualify for a VA or FHA loan (more on that next week). Also, the maximum loan amounts on FHA loans are lower than conventional loans, so the purchase price could also play into determining which loan program to use.

Have you filed a bankruptcy, but want to own a home again? You don’t have to wait seven years. If you have re-established credit to a qualifying score, buying a home can come sooner than you think. Unsure of your situation? Purchasing a home in Georgia? If yes to both, contact me today. We can start the prequalification process and see how quickly we can get you into a new home.

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Credit Score Basics for Home Buyers

February 9, 2017

A recent survey reported that 2.7 times more first time home buyers than repeat buyers believe they must improve their credit scores before buying a house.  First let’s dispel credit score myths.  A home buyer can possibly win mortgage approval with a credit score as low as 620.  If your score is 620 or higher, you can possibly win loan approval.

If your score is less than 620, you need to work to improve it before you can qualify.  If your score is 620 or higher, you may want to take steps to increase your score as better scores tend to lower mortgage costs.  Note that I am not a credit score repair specialist, but here are some basic, fundamental tips to improve your credit score:

Pay down your credit card balances:  You get the best score on each credit card account when your balance is less than 1/3 of that account’s credit limit.  Your score drops when your balance is more than 1/3 of the limit.  And your score drops even further if your score is more than ½ of the credit limit. 

Pay your bills on time:  Late payments lower your score.  The later the payment, the more your score is penalized.

image-credit-score-breakdown

Time heals all wounds:  The more time that has elapsed since your last late payment, the less those late payments will affect your current score.  Some credit issues have mandatory waiting periods.  For example, if your credit report shows a bankruptcy, 2 years must elapse before you can obtain a FHA mortgage, and 3 years must elapse before you can qualify for a conventional mortgage. 

Resolve account disputes now:  Mortgage underwriters hate account disputes.  If you have disputes on credit accounts, go ahead and resolve them prior to applying for a mortgage.

Be aware of collections accounts:  Note that I didn’t say to pay them off.  Sometimes, paying off a collection account will actually lower your credit score.  If you want to buy a home in the next 12 months or so, it may be best to just know about the collections accounts – you may have to deal with them as part of your mortgage process.  In some cases, we require the borrower to bring enough cash to close and to pay off collections account balances as part of the mortgage closing process.

If you want to buy a house in Georgia, get a good idea of your credit score and your monthly debt payments.  Then call me to discuss your loan options.  I’ll invest time coaching you on the best ways to help you win loan approval. 

More mortgage questions?  Check out our home buyer educational videos.

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Educating First Time Home Buyers

February 2, 2017

A recently published survey of 2016 home buyers shows that first time buyers (“FTBs) comprised a larger percentage (35%) of all home buyers than in 2015 (32%).  FTBs face greater challenges than buyers who have previously purchased homes.  In addition to the uncertainty and stress in making such a major financial decision for the first time, FTBs face additional financial challenges, some real and some more perceived.  For example:

  • 2.7 times more FTBs than repeat buyers believe they must improve their credit scores before buying a home.   
  • 2.9 times more FTBs than repeat buyers expect a home purchase delay due to their current lease terms.   
  • 3 times more FTBs than repeat buyers say they lack enough money for a down payment.

In short, first time buyers need significant education, advice and support.  In future blog posts, we will address each of the above challenges in more detail.  For now, let’s take a quick look at some ways Dunwoody Mortgage Services (“DMS”) helps to educate home buyers.

first-time-home-buyers

The DMS staff has created a series of home buyer education videos published on our website:  http://dunwoodymortgage.net/custompage-view.aspx?id=9.  These videos are concise and to the point, each covering a key mortgage process topic, such as cash to close, monthly payments, mortgage insurance, and more. 

We encourage our clients to plan early – last year I closed a loan for I client with whom I had been talking for 2 years.  My boss’ record is 7 years.  In short, we will take the time to listen, to coach, and to help our clients plan for a future home purchase.  And sometimes, it may take a few years to save enough money, to improve credit scores, or to meet tax return guidelines for self-employment.  Helping our clients plan for mortgage success is something the DMS staff enjoys doing.  

Also, we coach our clients to plan a home purchase that best fits their financial situation.  Oftentimes, a home buyer can qualify for a mortgage payment that is so high, they would have to change their lifestyle to live with the payment.  Such high payments can lead to significant financial stress – we call that being “house poor.”  We consult with our clients about how a mortgage payment will fit into their budget and lifestyle.  We encourage discipline and budgeting, with the goal of helping the client buy a home that they love, and that they can comfortably afford.

Know a first time home buyer who needs financial coaching and counsel?  Tell them about us here at Dunwoody Mortgage — we will invest a lot of time in them, so their first home investment will be successful, and with minimal stress. 

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Credit Reports and Qualifying for a Mortgage #3

October 19, 2016

In prior posts we reviewed the credit score and public record components of a credit report.  But even with a qualifying score and a clean public record history, that doesn’t mean you are in the clear.  There are other credit report factors that can create underwriting hurdles which we must overcome.  Here are some other details we consider…

The credit report shows a history of open and closed credit accounts.  Data shown for each account includes:

  • Current account balance.
  • Account credit limit.
  • Account type – credit card, mortgage, student loan, auto loan, etc.
  • Account status – open, closed, collections, etc.
  • Minimum payment – these are important because they are included in the client’s (let’s call her Mindy) debt to income ratio.  If the total of all monthly payments is too high, Mindy might not qualify for the loan desired.
  • Late payment history – late payments are categorized as follows — 30 day lates are not good; 60 day lates are bad, and 90 day lates are really bad.  The report shows the dates of the most recent late payments.

If Mindy’s late payments were made more than 2 or 3 years ago and she has been consistently making on-time payments since then, it likely will not cause loan denial.  However, if Mindy’s late payments occurred after a bankruptcy, then underwriting may deny the loan.  I’ve had this happen where the underwriter said no to a client with a bankruptcy in 2010 followed by two 30-day late payments in 2012.

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  • Account disputes – if Mindy has officially disputed an account, it will show on her report.  Underwriters do not like account disputes.  This is especially true for FHA mortgages when a disputed account balance exceeds $1,000.  In some cases, the dispute can lead to loan denial.  I’ve had clients who had to go through a multi-week process to get a dispute removed from their credit before we could win loan approval.  I search for the word “dispute” on all credit reports.
  • Collections accounts – when an account has a collections status, this can cause loan denial.  This is especially true for FHA mortgages.  If the total outstanding amount of all collections accounts exceeds $1,000, underwriters will not approve an FHA loan until the balances are paid in full.  I had a client with 3 collections accounts earlier this year.  The client had plenty of cash, so we simply included the payoff of all collections accounts at the closing of her home purchase.

Once again, there is much more to a credit report than the score.  If you know someone who wants to buy a home in Georgia, don’t let them get mislead by a lender in a hurry.  Refer them to Dunwoody Mortgage, we will invest enough time up front to give everyone great confidence that the mortgage will actually close.

 

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Credit Reports and Qualifying for a Mortgage #2

October 12, 2016

The last post covered the credit score component of a credit report.  But remember, there is much more to a mortgage credit report than just the score.  After looking at a client’s credit score, I next review any public record filed against the client (let’s call him “Matt”) in a court of law.  These include liens, judgements, foreclosures, and bankruptcies.  How do these items affect Matt’s ability to win loan approval?

  • Liens – A tax lien is a big red flag. The IRS doesn’t play around when it comes to collecting money you owe them.  And lenders don’t want to get in line behind the IRS when it comes to collecting payments.  If Matt has a tax lien, he will likely need to pay it off before we can win loan approval.  We may be able to win loan approval if Matt has a tax lien, but it will take some extra work.
  • Bankruptcies – Bankruptcies stay on a credit report for 7 years.  Matt cannot obtain a conventional loan for 4 years following the bankruptcy discharge date (the date when Matt was officially released from personal liability for debts included in the bankruptcy).  For FHA loans, the waiting period is 2 years after the bankruptcy discharge date.  There are some differences in how we treat Chapter 13 vs. Chapter 7 or 11 bankruptcies.
  • Foreclosures – Foreclosures also stay on a credit report for 7 years.  It is possible to win loan approval even with a foreclosure.  For conventional loans, a 7 year waiting period is required.  For FHA loans a 3 year waiting period is required.  And note that the clock starts when the foreclosing bank sells the old house to someone else.  Not when the bank first takes the house.

Gavel with money background

Gavel with money background

  • Short Sales – Once again, short sales stay on the report for 7 years. A short sale occurs when a loan servicer agrees to the sale of a property by the borrower to a third-party for less than the outstanding mortgage balance.  Waiting periods are 4 years for a conventional loans and 2 years for FHA loans.
  • Legal Judgments – Outstanding legal judgements must be paid off prior to or at closing.  Note that we can include payment of Matt’s legal judgments as part of the closing itself.

There is much more to a credit report than just the score.  When a lender pulls your report and quickly says “you qualify,” he or she might be doing you a disservice.  You want a lender who will take some time to look closely at your report, and deal with any potential issues up front.  If you plan to buy a home in Georgia and expect your lender to invest time in the details, call Dunwoody Mortgage Services.  We will help you avoid surprises.

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