Posts Tagged ‘MBS bonds’

Federal Reserve’s impact on rates

March 21, 2017

I feel like I spend a lot of time devoted to the topic of the Federal Funds Rate. The main reason is the misconception out there when it comes to the Federal Funds Rates. Last Wednesday, the Feds raised the Federal Funds Rate again. Every time this happens, I get calls and emails with people worrying about mortgage rates going up. That isn’t necessarily the case.

Mortgage rates are not determined by the Federal Funds Rate… car loans, credit card rates, second mortgages… those are impacted by the Federal Funds Rate.

Mortgage rates are determined by the value of Mortgage Backed Security Bonds (MBS bonds). As these bond values go up, mortgage rates go down. When these bond values fall, mortgage rates go up. Typically, when the Federal Funds Rate increases, it should help mortgage rates improve. Why?

MBS bonds hate inflation… I mean they can’t stand inflation. As inflation rises, MBS bond values plummet and make interest rates worse. As the Feds increase the Federal Funds Rate, it helps fight inflation. This, in turn, helps MBS bond values to rise, and mortgage rates to improve:

  • the Federal Funds Rate increased in December 2015. Over the next few months, mortgage rates improved by 0.500%. Rates stayed around these levels for all of 2016. Rates got worse at the end of 2016 after the election fueled a major stock market rally. That triggered another typical trend with rates… when stock values go up, bonds go down, and mortgage rates go up.
  • The Funds Rate was increased again in December 2016, and mortgage rates improved by 0.125% in the 6 weeks between Fed meetings.
  • We are about a week past the most recent rate increase by the Fed (third time since December 2015). So far, mortgage rates have improved by another 0.125%

What does this mean? When you hear a story about mortgage rates rising because of the Federal Funds Rate going up, don’t panic. The Funds Rate may go up, but mortgage rates could improve.

If you are looking to buy a home in Georgia, contact me today to get started. We have two tools to help you in an ever-changing rate market.

  • Float Down: Should rates improve after we’ve locked your rate, we can float it down at no cost to you one time during the loan process. If rates improve by 0.250% or more, we are within 30 days of closing, but 8 days prior to closing, we can float the rate down to current market value. That’s it. Easy! We have a three-week window to take advantage of this.
  • Lock-and-Shop: Worried that rates might go up? Don’t be. We can lock a rate for 60 days without being under contract to purchase a home. The rate is locked, find a home, and we start the loan process. The Float Down option as described above also applies to the Lock-and-Shop. So, you can get the protection of locking the rate, but also the opportunity to lower the rate should mortgage rates improve. The rate will not get worse so long as it is locked.

It is as simple as that!

Volatility Reigns

January 31, 2017

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

Market volatility is going to be the theme for 2017… or at least the theme for the foreseeable future. Basically, I am picking up where I left off a couple of weeks ago. As discussed last time, Wall Street seemed to embrace the idea of a Trump administration as stock values soared after the election… well, so did interest rates. Rates rose over a point in the roughly 2 months after the election. Rates did begin to improve some until…

Stocks hit 20,000 for the first time ever. Rates went back to their higher levels since the election. Then something unexpected happened… Trump signed the executive order for the immigration ban. The Dow is off about 200 points from its all time high, and interest rates improved by 0.250% in the last few days. It is going to be a bumpy ride. If this is too much, then take a deep breath, keep calm, and…

25a7010981055ef642dd8defad162f1d

In addition to keeping calm and loving our pets, is there anything else that can help when buying a home in this volatile market? Yes, there is!

As briefly mentioned in my last post, there is a one time FREE rate float down on locked interest rates with Dunwoody Mortgage Services. After we lock the rate, should rates improve by 0.250% or more, then we can float the rate down to the current market for the home purchase. The rate will NOT increase while locked; it can only improve while it is locked.

Looking to buy a home in Georgia? Like the idea of locking to protect your rate, but having the option to lower should rates improve? If so, contact me today? I can get you prequalified to make an offer, and explain all the details of the float down process.

footer_clayjeffreys4

Economic Uncertainty and Mortgage Rates

January 17, 2017

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

How does economic uncertainty impact mortgage rates? I’m glad you asked!

In general, when the economic outlook is good, investment dollars go into stocks. As money goes into stocks, there is less money available to go into bonds. This flow of money causes stock values to rise, and bond prices to fall. As mortgage backed security bonds (or MBS Bonds) values fall, interest rates rise.

Some recent recent examples:

  • Brexit Vote: when the UK voted to leave the EU, that sent shockwaves through the world financial markets. Stock markets around the world pulled back, and bond prices went up. Mortgage rates improved until…
  • US Presidential Vote: Mortgage rates soared as stocks soared after Trump was elected president of the United States. Seems stocks felt Trump’s election would be a boon for business in the US. Stocks flirted with all-time highs day after day once Trump won the election. With this much money going into stocks, bond prices dropped, and mortgage rates increased by over a full point (from low 3’s to mid 4’s) in the weeks following the election.
  • US Presidential Inauguration: as the nation gets ready for the 45th President of the United States, there are signs the honeymoon period is over. A recent article said Trump would have the lowest approval rating of any President at inauguration. The gains in stocks have slowed, and there is growing concern about the “trade war” rhetoric. Maybe a trade war works out in the long run, but the short run in hurts business, hurts investments, and can cause a recession. With these thoughts in mind, we’ve seen stocks pull back over the past couple of weeks, and mortgage rate have improved.

What does the future hold? For those wanting to see lower rates, economic uncertainty is a main contributor to rates improving. It is no coincidence that all-time lows in mortgage rates occurred during the Great Recession. It is also no coincidence that mortgage rates haven’t dramatically improved since the economic recovery from the Great Recession has been slow and painful for many. And there in-lies a great dilemma… the quickest way for mortgage rates to improve (outside of Governmental influence such as Quantitative Easing) is from economic hardship. While low rates are great, in the long run, a sluggish economy isn’t great either.

Looking to buy or refinance a home? If refinancing, sitting and waiting isn’t a bad idea. I am currently watching rate for several clients in hopes they continue to drop. Once we hit our target rate, we get started. If buying, this is trickier as you can’t sit and wait for a long time on rates when there is a closing date involved! This is where our FREE one time rate float down comes in handy. Ask me about it! If the home is in the state of Georgia, contact me. We can get started today on your loan.

footer_clayjeffreys4

How Could Fed Rate Increase Affect Mortgage Rates?

December 20, 2016

For the first time in a year, the United States Federal Reserve raised the federal funds rate by 0.25%.  How will that impact mortgage interest rates?

Here’s a history lesson:  The last time the FED raised the federal funds rate was in December 2015.  By the end of January 2016, mortgage interest rates actually improved by about a half point.  Mortgage rates then stayed flat (for the most part) until June and July, when they continued to improve.  Mortgage rates stayed at this very low level until election day.  From election day through December 15, 2016,  mortgage interest rates increased about 0.75%.

When trying to analyze mortgage interest rates, it makes sense to look at a mortgage loan as an investment.  Here’s why…Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac purchase most of the conforming mortgages originated in the USA.  They “pool” these mortgages into mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”) which are bought and sold on Wall Street just like other investments.  MBS provide investors with regular, predictable income (from the interest payments on the mortgages), so they are considered less “risky” than stocks and mutual funds.

But ultimately, MBS must compete with all other investments for investors’ dollars.  In the recent, post-election period, stock values have increased making equity investments more attractive.  To compete, lenders had to raise mortgage interest rates to provide a greater return and compete with the high-flying equities.

 

mbs-image

In addition, China has been selling large amounts of its US government debt holdings.  As China sells, that creates pressure to raise interest rates on US government debt.  Again, government debt competes with MBS for investor dollars.  As interest rates on government debt increase, mortgage rates may have to rise to remain attractive to investors.

So what is a home buyer to do?  If you plan to buy soon, you can relax knowing that, once you get a home under contract, your lender can lock your interest rate through your closing date.  This means that if market interest rates rise between the time you lock your rate until closing, you still pay the lower rate specified in your lock.  You are protected against rate increases.

In addition, Dunwoody Mortgage offers a free interest rate float down on some mortgage products.  This means that, if market mortgage rates drop after you lock your rate, we might be able to lower your rate before closing.  With the free float down, after you lock your rate, you are protected should interest rates increase, and you may still be allowed to benefit if market rates decrease.

Ultimately, we at Dunwoody Mortgage are working in the best interest of our borrowers.  If you are looking to buy a house anywhere in Georgia, and mortgage interest rate changes make you nervous, contact me.  We can set you up with a loan program that can help protect you against the ups and downs of mortgage interest rate changes.

blog_footer_RShaffer1

Feds may not raise rates at all this year

October 18, 2016


blog-author-clayjeffreys3

Well over a year ago, the Federal Reserve indicated they would begin raising the Federal Funding Rate. This started in December 2015 when the rate increased by 0.250% for the first time in almost a decade. While we didn’t expect a 0.250% increase each time the Feds met this year, surely there would be another increase at some point. Right?

The year is almost over, and the Feds have stood their ground. The comments from the most recent Fed meeting made it sound as if it is doubtful there would be an increase this year, but could be in 2017 as the economy continues to reach employment goals.

Does that mean potential buyers should panic as rates may go up in 2017? No, it doesn’t.

  • The Federal Funding rate does not impact mortgage rates. When the Federal Funding rate increases, rates go up on second mortgages, credit cards, car loans, etc.
  • Mortgage Rates go up and down along with the value of Mortgage Backed Security Bonds. To see plenty of previous posts on this topic, do a search for “MBS” in the “search this site” box in the upper right corner of the page.
  • The last time the Feds raised the Federal Funding Rate, Mortgage Rates improved. Rates are roughly 0.500% lower now than they were in December 2015.

So what to make of this? Don’t make home buying plans on what the Feds may or may not do. Don’t buy a home out of fear of rates going up. The best strategy is to get prequalified to buy a home, and purchase a home when the time is right for you… and not what the Feds or media dictates.

Looking to buy a home in Georgia? Contact me today. I’ll get you prequalified and get you ready for your home buying experience.

 

footer_clayjeffreys4

Feds have opposite impact on mortgage rates

February 22, 2016

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

Seems the increase of the Federal Funding Rate didn’t have the negative impact on mortgage rates that many of us read about/heard about in the media. Since the Feds increased the Federal Funding Rate, mortgage rates have improved by at least 0.375%. Mortgage rates now sit at their lowest point since the beginning of 2015.

CEO-PIC

As bonds values go up, mortgage rates go down.

Why did mortgage rates improve if the Federal Funding Rate increased by 0.250%?

As previously discussed in this blog, mortgage rates are determined by mortgage backed security bonds. As these bond values trade, mortgage rates change… when bond values go up, rates go down and vice-versa. Also, when stocks endure bad times, bonds excel. This means as stock values drop, bond values rise, and in-turn, mortgage rates improve.

We all know what happened on Wall Street in January/early February. The Dow posted some historically bad numbers. Whether people were afraid of the price of oil, the oil glut, the Feds raising the Federal Funding Rate, or something else, stock prices plummeted, and so too did mortgage rates.

How should consumers respond:

  1. Don’t worry about interest rates getting better after you’ve locked in a rate. We have a float down option on our rate locks. If rates improve, your locked rate may be able to improve too. The rate will not get worse so long as it is locked. In other words, your rate could get better, but not worse. I’ve had several clients take advantage of this feature in the past two months.
  2. If you are thinking of buying a home (or refinancing), now would be a good time to get serious about it. Mortgage rates are not far off of their all time historic lows. Even if rates improve, you can use the float down option I just described.

Looking to buy/refinance a home in the state of Georgia, contact me today to get started. We’ll get through the prequalification process and get you ready to buy your new home!

footer_clayjeffreys4

Is there a better day to lock a rate?

November 10, 2015

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

Last time, we discussed how mortgage rates change. It isn’t from the Federal Reserve raising rates. Mortgage rates move up and down along with the value of mortgage-backed securities. As these bond values go up, rates go down – and vice-versa.

Is there a better day to lock a rate? I think a better question is this… how much volatility can you handle?

The two days of the week that see the biggest swing in mortgage rates are Wednesdays and Fridays. That isn’t a surprise since the Federal Reserve release their meeting minutes on Wednesdays. Those meeting minutes are definitely market changers. Fridays is typically the day when economic news is released – such as the jobs report. Again, this can have a big impact on interest rates.

Mondays are the quietest day of the week as the Fed doesn’t release any information on Mondays, and very few economic news releases come out on Monday.

thGEZWG0OE

Do you like to hit at 17 when playing Blackjack? If so, then waiting to lock a rate until Wednesday afternoon or Monday morning (from Friday’s market changes) might be the way to go. Depending on the market that day, you may see rates get better (or worse) by 0.125%.

Don’t have the stomach for gambling? Want to think about a rate prior to locking? Then a Monday rate quote/lock is probably best for you.

Want to know more about rates, how they change, and why you should lock. Contact me today for more information. If you live in the state of Georgia, I can also prequalify you for your new home loan.

footer_clayjeffreys4

All Eyes on Greece

June 16, 2015

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

The islands of Greece may look peaceful, but the current negotiations with the Greek government and its Euro zone partners are anything but peaceful. The outcome will impact all of the world’s financial markets.

Santorini%20Greece

The Dow ended at its 2015 low on Monday with fears of a Greek default brewing. Credit default swaps are anticipating a 75% chance of a Greek default. Greek creditors (the International Monetary Fund, the European Central Bank, and the EU) drew a line in the sand last week and are now waiting for Greece to respond.

Why am I talking about this? Because the events in Greece will most likely impact mortgage rates. Here’s how:

  • As the talks break down and we move closer to a default or even an exist from the Euro (commonly referred to as “Grexit”), financial markets all over the world will begin to lose value. This is already happening in the European and Asian financial markets. The Dow hit its 2015 low on Monday (although it has recovered some today).
  • Also expect the value of the Euro to continue to decline. A year ago, a Euro was worth €1.36 to $1.00. Now it is down to €1.12. The value will move closer to a 1:1 ratio as worries grow over a default/Grexit.
  • When all of this happens, where does the world turn to for a safer return on investment? For now, it continues to be the US Dollar. Money will move out of stocks and foreign markets and into US Bonds and Mortgage Back Security (MBS) Bonds. As the value of MBS Bonds goes up, rates go down.

We’ve seen this happen previously with the Greek debacle. Last year, the Federal Reserve ended their tapering plan and are now out of the MBS Bond buying business. Financial analysts expected interest rates to rise in 2014. Well, we all know rates improved. Part of the reason was the process described above. Fears of a Greek default helped to improve MBS Bond prices, and interest rates got lower.

Will we see a similar impact this time? We’ll find out soon enough. If another potential default is avoided (again), maybe rates get worse as the financial markets love even the impression of stability/no default. That said, the closer we get to a default, the more likely we will see an improvement in interest rates.

Let’s see how the rest of the month unfolds. Next up is the Thursday meeting between the Greek government and their creditors. That meeting will set the tone for the rest of June.

If rates do improve, my clients can look to take advantage of it with a free float down on their locked rate. Want to know more about a float down on a locked rate? Contact me today. If buying a home in the state of Georgia, we can lock your rate to ensure it does not get worse, but also look to float it down should rates improve.

footer_clayjeffreys4

QE3 is officially over

November 3, 2014

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

As promised, the Federal Reserve ended their Quantitative Easing (also called QE) program last week. This wasn’t unexpected. Toward the end of 2013, the Feds announced they would begin tapering off their purchasing of bonds, which included mortgage backed security bonds (or MBS bonds). The Feds had several objectives in buying bonds, and one of them was to help push interest rates lower. They achieved that goal by purchasing MBS bonds. As the value and demand of MBS bonds increases, interest rates decrease.

The purpose of tapering was to prevent a financial market that was accustomed to the Feds purchasing bonds from freaking out by its sudden withdrawal. A practical example – the Feds were acting as though they were introducing a fish to a new aquarium. You keep the fish in the bag of water it was placed in at the pet store, and let the fish float in the bag of water in the new aquarium to get adjusted to the water temperature of its new home. If you don’t do this prior to releasing the fish, the shock could kill it.

goldfish-bag

With the Feds officially out of the bond buying business, one of the instruments that helped interest rates reach historic lows is gone. Will interest rates rise? Most analysts thought rates would in 2014, but rates are a little lower now than they were in January 2014. That said, rates aren’t far off their historic lows from a couple years ago – meaning, rates have much more room to get worse than to get better.

One important point to clarify in the Feds statement. The Fed’s plan is to continue to keep short term lending rates near zero for the foreseeable future. Short term lending rates and interest rates are not the same thing. The short term lending refers to the Federal Funding Rate. Interest rates are determined by the value of MBS bonds, which change daily just like the stock prices of Apple, Google, UPS, etc. The Feds are no longer trying to influence MBS bonds now that QE3 is over.

What does this mean for those looking to buy a home? The simple answer is, we don’t know. Interest rates could stay the same or begin to get worse. Instead of knowing the Feds are in the background helping to keep MBS bond prices high, their values are now dependent solely on market factors.

If you are looking to buy a home or refinance, look to get started soon. Everyone has expected interest rates to rise the past few years, and they haven’t yet. Still, as I said earlier in this post, interest rates have a lot more room to get worse than to get better. If you are looking to buy in Georgia, contact me to get started.

footer_clayjeffreys4

It’s no joke!

April 1, 2014

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

This year continues to bring surprises our way. The good news is these surprises are for real, and not a cleverly planned April Fools joke.

 

Sadly this video is a joke.

Home Values Continue to Rise

With home sales declining from January 2014 to February 14 (their lowest level in close to two years), one might think “here we go again” with the housing slump coming back. That’s not the case this time! Instead of a recession or foreclosures causing home sales to decline, it was the harsh winter across the country that kept people from going to look at homes and/or putting homes on the market.

The good news is that home values are continuing to climb with a rise of roughly 9% across the country compared to prices a year ago. Metro Atlanta saw a year-over-year increase of 15%. Also, the number of short sales and foreclosures continue to decrease.

While the number of home sales dropped early this year, the trend is actually positive for the housing market. With the harsh winter behind us, expect home sales to rise in the coming months.

Interest Rates Hold Steady

Most of the experts (and this blog) felt interest rates would rise in 2014 as the Federal Reserve began and continued their tapering plan. Not only have rates held steady, they have slightly improved thus far in 2014. Why?

As recently posted to this blog, world events impact interest rates. When the Feds announced the tapering plan, China and other emerging market countries were not releasing reports with negative economic outlook projections. On top of that, Russia was getting ready for the Winter Olympics and everyone was playing nice in the Ukraine.

Fast forward a few months… the uncertainty in Eastern Europe coupled with a slow down in economic output from emerging markets has made the US Dollar a “safe haven” investment again. Foreign investors are looking to buy more bonds than the Federal Reserve have made available from their tapering plan. The demand has caused bond values to rise so far in 2014, which has made interest rates improve a little so far this year.

Just because today is April 1st, it doesn’t mean this news isn’t true. We have seen home values continue to rise even though homes sales have dropped a little in 2014. It is definitely a seller’s market right now. We’ve also witnessed interest rates slightly improve despite the warnings of the tapering impact on rates.

It’s no joke – housing prices are rising and rates are holding steady. If you are looking to buy a new home this year, get started today! If you are buying in Georgia, contact me. I can prequalify you and get your housing adventure into full spring (get it!).

footer_clayjeffreys4