Posts Tagged ‘loan advice’

FHA loans are back!

July 21, 2015

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

President Obama issued an executive order that reduced the monthly mortgage insurance premium on FHA loans by more than a third. This order started in January. Since then, FHA loan applications rose dramatically. From February through May of this year, the number of FHA loans essentially doubled from the same time period in 2014.

Why all the love for FHA loans? Because the total monthly payment is more competitive now with conventional loans. Prior to the change, home buyers with excellent credit would see monthly mortgage insurance rates 2.5 times higher for FHA loans than conventional loans. Since the change, FHA monthly mortgage insurance is still more expensive, but nowhere near as bad as it was before the executive order.

In fact, I’ve been able to recommend FHA loans again to my clients. What I mean by that is this… prior to Obama’s executive order, the FHA mortgage insurance was so much higher, it made the total monthly payment for FHA uncompetitive to that of conventional loans. Only clients needing a down payment as low as 3.5% or had credit scores under 660 would really consider using FHA loans.

Now the total monthly payments are more balanced, and you see that by the amount of FHA loan applications now being processed. Here is a brief break down of FHA vs. Conventional loans on a decision making basis using credit scores.

  • those with excellent credit will still likely go with a conventional loan even though the interest rate is better on an FHA because mortgage insurance is not permanent (FHA loans can be), and there is no upfront mortgage insurance payment due at closing (FHA requires this).
  • those with average credit could go either way. It really depends on the exact credit score and the rate difference. Remember, the rate for FHA loans are better than conventional, so even though the monthly mortgage insurance could be higher (and permanent, more on this in a minute), the total payment could be basically the same when you take the interest rate difference into consideration.
  • those with below average credit scores tend to go FHA now. Why? The interest rate is much higher on a conventional loan than FHA loans for lower credit scores. Also, the monthly mortgage insurance payment is higher for conventional loans once credit scores go below 680.

The big drawback to FHA loans is that the mortgage insurance can be permanent. That said, under the “old guidelines”, it would take over 11 years of regular, on time payments before mortgage insurance on FHA loans would fall off. Since most people move on average every 7  years, the mortgage insurance would be on the loan the entire time – so “permanent” isn’t as scary as it sounds.

Don’t know if an FHA loan is right for you? If you are buying in the state of Georgia, contact me. We can talk about your situation and decide what loan is right for you and get you into your new home!

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Type of income and prequalification

July 5, 2010

“Why does it matter how I’m paid as long as I get paid?”

I’ve received that question numerous times over the past several years being in the mortgage industry. The question does make sense – as long as income from a job is coming in on a regular basis, why does it matter if someone is self- employed, a W2 employee, or a 1099 contract worker?

Unfortunately, for the self-employed or individuals paid on a commission or bonus structure, it does matter. Why? Due to the up-and-down nature of running a business or income based on monthly/annual performance, underwriters want to see a historical record of income that is earned over the course of up to two years.

Unless you are a W2 employee whose salary will be the same every month regardless of the economy or sales, the only way to document your income is through annual federal tax returns. By reviewing tax returns for the past two years, an underwriter can see documented monthly income for 24 months to gauge expected future income.

Here are some examples of different ways one might be paid and what steps are necessary to document the income:

  • W2 salaried income – this is the easiest to document. All that is needed is the past 30 days of pay stubs. If recently moved to a new job in the same field still as a W2 employee, a pay stub reflecting 30 days on the job with an acceptance letter to the new position should do it.
  • W2 base pay with commission/bonus income – if commission/bonus income is less than 25% of the total salary, then the same rules apply as above should apply. If more than 25% of the total salary, then up to two years of tax returns will be required to document the income.
  • Full commission income – up to two years tax returns will be required. Note that any business expense write offs on the tax return will lower the income that can be used to qualify you for the loan.
  • Self-employed – two years of tax returns will be required. Again, any claimed business expenses (personal or for the business itself) will reduce the income that can be used to qualify you for the loan.
  • Bonus income – two years documented bonus income will be required along with documenting its continuance.
  • Same job at the same company but change from W2 salary to commission/bonus income – This is happening more frequently in the business world. Positions that were once salaried are becoming positions with base pay plus commission. If the base salary is sufficient to qualify for the loan, then only pay stubs are required. However, if the commission is also needed to qualify for the loan, then up to two years of tax returns would be required.

Loan programs such as stated income and no documentation loans are no more due to the credit crunch. This means all income must be verified and documented – making how one gets paid all the more important.

If you are looking to buy a home or refinance an existing one and you are not paid as a W2 salaried employee, it is imperative to speaking with a mortgage consultant to ensure everything is order before you are ready to make an offer. If you are in the state of Georgia, I would enjoy the chance to review your situation and help qualify you to buy a home–give me a call!