Posts Tagged ‘how much home should I buy’

Homebuyers squeezed out of the market

June 13, 2017

Last week there were a series of articles published by the Wall Street Journal, CNN Money, and more describing how Millennials are being squeezed out of buying homes. For the most part, articles focused solely on lending requirements. Honestly, that misses the mark on what is really going on out there right now. Let’s dig into this a little more.

The articles primarily focused on how lending guidelines are stricter. While that is true when compared to 2007, lending requirements have loosened up quite a bit over the past several years. Here are some quick examples:

  • Conventional loans allow borrowers with a credit score of 620 (the same as FHA). Average credit is 660-680 depending on what article/source you read, so home buyers with below average credit can qualify to purchase a home.
  • Smaller down payments are back. VA and USDA loans do not require a down payment, FHA only requires 3.5% down, and Conventional loans can be used to buy a home with as little as 3% down.
  • Self-employed borrowers with an established business of 5+ years can qualify to buy a home with only one year of tax returns.
  • Condos can be purchased with as little as 3% down.
  • Rental income from investment properties can be used even if the property hasn’t been rented out for two years.

Lending guidelines are much more lenient today than they were just a few years ago. That isn’t really the problem.

A Washington Post article from January discussed the elephant in the room, and nailed it when it comes to the issue that all home buyers are facing – inventory.

I attended a Realtor meeting recently where a stat was given stating there is less than a 3-month supply of homes available in in-town Atlanta. A balanced market is a 6-month supply, and nationwide the supply of homes is well under 6 months. That’s not good. Think it is bad in Atlanta? It’s worse in Seattle. The lack of inventory puts Millennials (and any home buyer with a smaller down payment) at a disadvantage. Also, it is pushing home values higher than a normal market due to the impact of supply and demand.

How does one compete in this market? A few things come to mind.

  1. Home buyers must go out and look at homes as soon as they are listed. This can be difficult depending on one’s schedule, but homes are going under contract in a few days in most cases.
  2. Home buyers should be underwritten prior to going out to look at a home. This way the offer letter isn’t a prequalification letter or pre-approval letter, but the letter can read the home buyers are “approved to purchase a home pending a satisfactory appraisal, clear title, and sufficient insurance coverage.” That is much stronger than a simple “prequalification” letter, and I go into more detail this in a previous blog post.

By planning and being ready to move on a home at a moment’s notice, home buyers can increase their odds of getting under contract on a home.

Looking to purchase in Georgia? Wanting to get ahead of the game? Contact me today, and we’ll get started toward achieving the goal of your home ownership!

PMI vs MIP vs MPI… What is the difference?

May 17, 2017

Lots of acronyms there. What do they all mean?

Many people are familiar with the term “PMI” or Private Mortgage Insurance. This is insurance the borrower pays on behalf of the lender in case of a mortgage default. The insurance protects the lender and becomes a requirement when purchasing a home with less than a 20% down payment (or refinancing with less than 20% equity in the home).

MIP stands for Mortgage Insurance Premium and is completely the same thing as PMI, but that is what mortgage insurance is called on FHA loans.

So what is MPI? That stands for Mortgage Protection Insurance. When buying or refinancing a home, the home owner will get plenty of these offers in the mail in the weeks/months after buying a home. Why? Companies pay people to search through newly recorded deeds at the county. This is legal since the deed is a matter of public record. With the deed information, a company knows your name, your new home address, and who did your loan. The offers for Mortgage Protection Insurance will come regularly in the mail, and these companies make it look like the letter is from your mortgage company. They can be sneaky with these letters.

What does MPI do? If you choose this option, MPI will pay the loan balance off for a borrower in the event of their death. Sounds good, but let’s dig a little deeper. The premiums for this insurance are typically significantly higher thank those for life insurance as they require minimal to no medical examination or health screening. Anyone in any health condition can get this insurance by paying the monthly premiums. The other downside is that as mortgage payments are made, the principal balance of their loan reduces. This means the payout in the event of the borrower’s death reduces… in other words, the premiums stay the same, but the death benefit decreases every month.

MPI is a fantastic option for someone who cannot, for whatever reason, qualify for term life insurance. If you can get term life insurance, it is the better way to go. Typically, people can get more coverage that doesn’t diminish each month for a lower monthly premium.

Just bought your first home and don’t have life insurance? Or maybe you’ve owned your home for a few years, but your family has grown since you last looked at your life insurance coverage. Regardless of your need, my friends at the Sheldon Baker Group can assist you in getting free quotes from the top carriers in the life insurance industry. You can check out the Sheldon Baker Group life insurance page here. You can also call 678-793-2322 or email to sheldon@sheldonbakergroup.com.

Whether you use my friends at the Sheldon Baker Group or someone else, life insurance is important as you own a home and/or have a growing family. Use the MPI offers in the mail as a reminder to evaluate your coverage.

 

Lock and shop with rate float down

April 25, 2017

Last time we discussed the competitive market for home buyers. I suggested getting underwritten prior to making an offer on a home. That way the offer can say the buyer is “approved” and can close in about two weeks (only need the appraisal!). When I talk about this option with clients, they also ask about whether they can lock the interest rate. Most lenders/banks prefer a buyer be under contract to purchase a home, but that isn’t the case with Lock and Shop.

Buyers can lock in their interest rate today without a purchase contract, and then go out looking for a home. The program typically works like this:

  • We start the loan process as if we have a contract to purchase a home.
  • We submit the loan to underwriting for approval, and can lock the borrower into a 60 day rate lock.
  • This provides plenty of time to find a home, get under contract, and complete the closing

This is a great program for buyers. They can go ahead and get underwritten for a home purchase. They can also lock in a rate now, and not feel so pressured to find a home before rates could possibly get worse. With a 60 day lock, there really isn’t a rush on either side of the equation (finding a house and then getting loan approval). 60 days is more than enough time for both!

On top of that, there is a one-time FREE float down on the rate lock. The window to use the float down is within 30 days of closing (or rate expiration) and 8 days prior to closing (or rate expiration). If interest rates have improved by 0.250% or more, the rate can be lowered to the current market. That’s it. No fees and no tricks. There is a roughly 3-week window to use the float down, and rates must be improved by 0.250% or more.

If you’d like to learn more about the lock and shop program for a home purchase in Georgia, you know where to find me!

Competing in a seller’s market

April 18, 2017

By now I’m sure everyone is aware it is a seller’s market right now. In metro Atlanta, there is less than a 3 month supply of homes available to purchase. For a balanced market, it is good to have close to 6 months of homes available. This is a big change from a few years ago when it was a buyer’s market… low ball offers, take time looking, find the absolute perfect home. Today when making an offer, the initial offer starts at the list price. You better get to a property within day or two of it being listed or it may be under contract, and buyers are making compromises on a home. If the home has, say, 80-90% of what they are looking for in a home, make an offer!

Even with those strategies, buyers can still find themselves being one of many offers on a home in this crowded real estate market. How else can a buyer differentiate themselves from the competition?

                              How some home buyers feel in this market!

One way is being underwritten prior to being under contract on a home purchase. I can start the loan process, send out loan docs, collect financial docs, and submit to underwriting with a “To Be Determined” property address. Once out of underwriting, I can give a letter to my clients for an offer that says “Approved”…. not a prequalification letter… not a preapproval letter… a letter that says the buyer is approved for the purchase pending the appraisal. The buyer can also close in as little as two weeks. We only need the appraisal back at that point!

Looking to buy a home in Georgia? Having problems differentiating yourself from other buyers in this crowded market? Contact me today. I can not only help you get prequalified, but we can submit your loan to underwriting for an approval on the loan. That will give you a major advantage over buyers with a letter that says “prequalified” or “preapproved.”

Using government loans after a derogatory credit event

February 21, 2017

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Last week, we focused on using conventional loans to purchase a home after a major derogatory credit event such as a bankruptcy, short sale, foreclosure, etc. This week, we will focus on VA and FHA loans offered by the government.

In every instance, a government loan has a shorter waiting period after one of these events. It is the loan of choice to use if it will fit your needs. Let’s discuss the waiting periods:

  • Chapter 7 bankruptcy: requires a 2-year wait
  • Chapter 13 bankruptcy: requires a 1-year wait from the beginning of the payout period
  • Multiple bankruptcy filings: VA requires only 2 years, but FHA is a case-by-case basis
  • Foreclosure: VA once again is only 2 years, but FHA is 3 years.
  • VA Specific: in order the qualify for a VA loan (in addition to being a veteran), there must be a 1 year minimum of re-established after the judgement dates and other derogatory events paid/resolved
  • FHA Specific: If HUD has a claim against a borrower for a foreclosed/short sold home (and that home was financed using an FHA loan), a borrower isn’t eligible for a new FHA loan until after 3 years from the date of the claim being paid.

As anyone can read here, government loans have a much shorter waiting period than conventional loans. As low as one year, but mostly just a 2-year wait. An FHA or VA loan would be the preferred method for buying a home after one of these major events. That said, there a couple of situations that make conventional loans the way to go:

  • the borrower is not eligible for a VA loan (so you go FHA unless….)
  • the loan needed to purchase a home will exceed the maximum FHA allowed loan amount
  • there is a claim against the borrower from HUD
  • a borrower is not eligible for an FHA loan due to CAIVRS (a government credit monitoring tool to ensure people who take out government loans pay them back)

The last two on the list are not that common, so buying a home within the FHA maximum loan limits would be the way to go. In addition to a shorter waiting period, the interest rate tends to be better than conventional loans, the borrower only needs a 3.5% down payment, and the monthly mortgage insurance rate is lower. A borrower’s credit score will confirm those items, but in general, those are all reasons why FHA loans are the best way to go after a derogatory credit event.

Completed a bankruptcy two years ago, and ready to buy a home in Georgia? If so, we can get started today in the process. Contact me and we’ll make sure you qualify for a loan, and then send you out looking for your next home.

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Planning Your Home Purchase While Renting

February 16, 2017

A recent survey reported that 2.9 times more first time home buyers than repeat buyers expect a home purchase delay due to their current lease terms.  My first reaction to this statement is “No duh!”  I would expect most repeat buyers do not have a lease but own their home.  Lease terms definitely can affect a first time buyers’ purchase timeframe.  A lease is a written legal contract between the landlord and the lessee.  Note that I am not an attorney, but here are some common sense thoughts about leases and home purchases.

Firstly, plan ahead.  If you know your lease terminates in 6 months and you want to buy a house, go ahead and start planning now.  Submit a mortgage application and get prequalified.  Build a relationship with a Realtor.  Set aside more money for a down payment and closing.  Planning ahead may help you win loan approval and buy your dream home.  Waiting until the last minute will likely cause you stress and frustration.

landlord

Secondly, know your lease terms.  What is the penalty for terminating your lease early?  Do you forfeit your security deposit?  Is there a different penalty?  Then evaluate the contractual penalty versus the home you want.  If you find and can buy your dream home, and the lease termination penalty is not too steep, you may want to go ahead and buy now.  The key here is to know the penalty so you can evaluate your opportunities.  Is missing the opportunity to buy the perfect home worth saving the security deposit you paid a few years ago?  Only you can make that choice.

Thirdly, talk with your landlord.  If your lease expires in 30 days and you still haven’t found the perfect house, perhaps you can negotiate a month to month lease or a 90 day lease continuation instead of signing a longer term lease.  Perhaps you could offer a slightly higher monthly rent to compensate the landlord for the shorter term lease, thus “buying more time” to search for and find the right home for you.

In short, planning ahead, knowing your lease details, and making an effort to negotiate with your landlord may give you the flexibility you need to find the perfect first home, without the stress of having a “deadline” hanging over you.  When you are ready to do your home purchase planning, call me.  I will give you as much time as you need to coach and counsel you, making sure you are truly ready to buy your first home.

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Feds may not raise rates at all this year

October 18, 2016


blog-author-clayjeffreys3

Well over a year ago, the Federal Reserve indicated they would begin raising the Federal Funding Rate. This started in December 2015 when the rate increased by 0.250% for the first time in almost a decade. While we didn’t expect a 0.250% increase each time the Feds met this year, surely there would be another increase at some point. Right?

The year is almost over, and the Feds have stood their ground. The comments from the most recent Fed meeting made it sound as if it is doubtful there would be an increase this year, but could be in 2017 as the economy continues to reach employment goals.

Does that mean potential buyers should panic as rates may go up in 2017? No, it doesn’t.

  • The Federal Funding rate does not impact mortgage rates. When the Federal Funding rate increases, rates go up on second mortgages, credit cards, car loans, etc.
  • Mortgage Rates go up and down along with the value of Mortgage Backed Security Bonds. To see plenty of previous posts on this topic, do a search for “MBS” in the “search this site” box in the upper right corner of the page.
  • The last time the Feds raised the Federal Funding Rate, Mortgage Rates improved. Rates are roughly 0.500% lower now than they were in December 2015.

So what to make of this? Don’t make home buying plans on what the Feds may or may not do. Don’t buy a home out of fear of rates going up. The best strategy is to get prequalified to buy a home, and purchase a home when the time is right for you… and not what the Feds or media dictates.

Looking to buy a home in Georgia? Contact me today. I’ll get you prequalified and get you ready for your home buying experience.

 

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Credit Reports and Qualifying for a Mortgage #2

October 12, 2016

The last post covered the credit score component of a credit report.  But remember, there is much more to a mortgage credit report than just the score.  After looking at a client’s credit score, I next review any public record filed against the client (let’s call him “Matt”) in a court of law.  These include liens, judgements, foreclosures, and bankruptcies.  How do these items affect Matt’s ability to win loan approval?

  • Liens – A tax lien is a big red flag. The IRS doesn’t play around when it comes to collecting money you owe them.  And lenders don’t want to get in line behind the IRS when it comes to collecting payments.  If Matt has a tax lien, he will likely need to pay it off before we can win loan approval.  We may be able to win loan approval if Matt has a tax lien, but it will take some extra work.
  • Bankruptcies – Bankruptcies stay on a credit report for 7 years.  Matt cannot obtain a conventional loan for 4 years following the bankruptcy discharge date (the date when Matt was officially released from personal liability for debts included in the bankruptcy).  For FHA loans, the waiting period is 2 years after the bankruptcy discharge date.  There are some differences in how we treat Chapter 13 vs. Chapter 7 or 11 bankruptcies.
  • Foreclosures – Foreclosures also stay on a credit report for 7 years.  It is possible to win loan approval even with a foreclosure.  For conventional loans, a 7 year waiting period is required.  For FHA loans a 3 year waiting period is required.  And note that the clock starts when the foreclosing bank sells the old house to someone else.  Not when the bank first takes the house.
Gavel with money background

Gavel with money background

  • Short Sales – Once again, short sales stay on the report for 7 years. A short sale occurs when a loan servicer agrees to the sale of a property by the borrower to a third-party for less than the outstanding mortgage balance.  Waiting periods are 4 years for a conventional loans and 2 years for FHA loans.
  • Legal Judgments – Outstanding legal judgements must be paid off prior to or at closing.  Note that we can include payment of Matt’s legal judgments as part of the closing itself.

There is much more to a credit report than just the score.  When a lender pulls your report and quickly says “you qualify,” he or she might be doing you a disservice.  You want a lender who will take some time to look closely at your report, and deal with any potential issues up front.  If you plan to buy a home in Georgia and expect your lender to invest time in the details, call Dunwoody Mortgage Services.  We will help you avoid surprises.

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Continuing Ed for MLOs

September 22, 2016

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The fall is here, and I know what that means… time to complete annual Continuing Education so I can keep my Mortgage Loan Originator (also called MLO) License.

I am happy to say, I’ve completed the steps for another renewal. Yeah! But what exactly goes into a renewal if you do not work for a bank? It is a good question that I’ll happily address.

For Mortgage Loan Officers working for non-depository institutions (such as mortgage brokers or licensed mortgage lenders like I am at Dunwoody Mortgage Services), there are several hoops to jump through each year:

  1. Need to complete an approved 8 hours continuing education course.
  2. Must authorize a background check every other year. If a felony is on an employee’s record, then their license is revoked. Georgia will not allow felons to have a license to work as a MLO. The background is done on a regular basis since an arrest could occur after the initial background check.
  3. Must authorize a credit report check that looks at more than just a credit score:
    • Any unpaid judgements will result in a license suspension and possible revocation.
    • If a MLO is behind on child support or alimony, it will cause the license to be suspended and possible revoked.
    • Must be current on mortgage payments and student loans.
    • Foreclosures are also a big no-no.
    • Bankruptcies and other debt delinquencies can cause problems on a license renewal

In short – to be licensed to work in the mortgage industry, the MLO must not be a felon, pay their bills, and not be behind on any child support/alimony/court ordered payments.

What about MLOs that work for banks? What do they need to do to keep their license? That is up to the bank really as the only requirement for their MLO license renewal is to be employed by a bank. It is the bank’s responsibility to address the continuing education and vetting of their employees. Technically, that means MLOs that have a felony on their record (The Georgia felony requirement doesn’t apply to nationwide banks, but does apply to local Georgia banks such as Resurgens Bank), or are behind on the child support, have their own home foreclosed upon, etc. can still work with clients to purchase a home if a large bank is willing to hire them.

It turns out that the most educated and vetted individuals working in the mortgage industry actually don’t work for banks.

Want to buy a home in the state of Georgia? Want to work with a professional that is educated, vetted, and has a decade of experience originating mortgages? Contact me today. I am more than happy to help you get going!

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VA Loans: Funding Fee

August 16, 2016

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VA loans do not require mortgage insurance, but they do have a VA funding fee… which is another way of saying an “up-front” mortgage insurance. The funding fee amount is based on the down payment being made, whether the borrower is considered a veteran or a reserve, and if the borrower has used a VA loan in the past.

There is no way to get around the VA funding fee unless the VA deems you to have a disability from military service. If so, then the fee is waived entirely regardless of whether or not the VA loan applicant makes a down payment. There are a few good things about the funding fee. First, the VA loan applicant doesn’t have to pay this fee at closing. Much like FHA up-front mortgage insurance, the funding fee is rolled into the loan amount. Second, the amount of the funding fee can be reduced by making a down payment. For example, let’s assume this is the first time a veteran has used a VA loan to buy a home.

  • With no down payment, the up-front fee is 2.15% of the loan amount. This fee is rolled into the home loan, so it is not required to be paid by the VA loan applicant at closing.
  • The funding fee drops to 1.50% when making a 5% down payment
  • The funding fee goes down to 1.25% if making a 10% down payment.

Again, this example is for VA loan applicants qualifying as a veteran status. There are different amounts if qualifying as a reserve status. The funding fee can also increase when using a VA loan on buying your next home. The subsequent VA loan use jumps to 3.30% if making no down payment, but drops back to 1.5% when making a 5% down payment. While no down payment is required, you’ll save thousands of dollars by making as little as a 5% down payment.

Regardless of the down payment, there is no monthly mortgage insurance payments ever on a VA loan.

Are you a veteran looking to buy a home? Is this home in Georgia? Regardless of the loan program you plan to use, contact me today. We can get you prequalified, look over all your loan options, and get you on your way to home ownership!

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