Posts Tagged ‘fixer upper’

Delayed Financing

February 24, 2015

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

Let’s say you found a great deal on a home, but there is a problem. The home isn’t inhabitable… the plumbing was stolen out of the home, so there is no running water… there is major roof damage that needs to be repaired, and the current owner can’t/won’t do anything about it… the home was a foreclosure that now has broken windows, smashed doors, missing light fixtures, etc. In any of these scenarios, a bank would not lend money on the home until the home was repaired and could pass an appraisal inspection.

You are fortunate enough to be able to buy the home in cash, but don’t want to part with the money when the home could be financed at historically low interest rates. Sure, you could buy the home in cash. Then do a cash out refinance after owning the home for six months, but the money is gone for six months. Until now…

With a Delayed Financing loan, a buyer can purchase a home today “as is”, and apply for a loan as soon as the next day. In this scenario, a buyer can make a cash offer, get a quick close, and turn around and get their money right back instead of waiting six months. Here is how you do it:

1. The purchase must have been an arms-length transaction.
2. The cash used for the purchase must be appropriately documented.
3. The new loan amount cannot exceed the cost of buying the home.
4. To prevent fraud, a copy of the HUD-1 from the purchase of the home will be required.
5. A title search must show there is not liens on the property.

If the home meets these criteria, in addition to the normal loan approval process, the buyer can get their money back in weeks instead of months.

Have you purchased a home recently that needed work done before the home would pass an appraisal inspection? Do you want to buy a home like this? If you are able to purchase the home in cash, you can get that money back sooner rater than later. If the home is in Georgia, contact me today, and we can get started!

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Flip this Alpharetta Foreclosure

May 3, 2011

I – Clay Jeffreys and overseer of this blog 🙂 – thought it would be great to include this post from regular guest contributor Van Purser. While this blog details flipping a home, it also provides some insight into work that can be done on a home as a primary residence or investment property using the Fannie Mae HomeStyle loan I discussed in an earlier post.

In our last newsletter we reported on the status of a HUD foreclosure we were planning on purchasing to renovate and sell.  Since that time the renovation was completed and the property was resold and closed on April 12th.

We felt that this particular home, located in The Hunters Forest subdivision, off of Jones Bridge Rd, should sell for the mid to upper $140’s.  We had originally planned on adding a sunroom to elevate the price to the mid $150’s, but decided not to.  We felt that with our purchase price of $71,000 we would still be able to make a profit without adding the sunroom.

Our plans were to close just before Christmas, and to begin the renovation shortly after the beginning of the year, so that we would have it ready to return to market by March.  Instead we closed on November 30th, and started the renovation immediately, in order to provide work for our crew in advance of Christmas.  It worked out great. We finished on Christmas Eve.  Three weeks, and over $32,000 later we were finished and ready to put property on the market.

We started out $154,900, but after a month realized that the market would not support it and reduced the price to $149,900.  This increased activity, but did not yield a contract.  We continued to monitor the market and decided to reduce the price again to $144,900 after a couple more weeks.  Within a few days we were under contract at $142,000.  Not exactly what we had hoped for, but still worth the effort.

We were so please with the renovation, and the BEFORE & AFTERS show the transformation that took place.  One thing we did differently on this home was re-trim the entire home.  This added a lot of character to the home.  Another thing we did was add the dividing wall between the living room and dining area, to provide some separation.  Also, we had to add a new deck and start over in the bathrooms.

Homes like these are available for purchase, and will provide an opportunity to improve the neighborhood and to make a profit.  If you would like to try one, let me know.

Flip this house

March 22, 2011

This home is a recent foreclosure we purchased in Lawrenceville.  It was actually listed through our Multiple Listing Service and was originally on the market for $69,000.  We made an offer for $58,000 which was accepted. The inspection revealed a couple of structural issues that needed to be addressed, so we amended our purchase price to $54,800.  For a complete Before & After click here or on the image below.

The renovation took a longer than usual, three weeks instead of two, but not bad considering the amount of work that was done.  The largest contributor to the extra week was the amount of landscaping that was needed.

The yard had eroded over the years due to water run off.  We decided to remove several trees in the front yard, add a rail road tie retaining will in the rear yard and front yard, and we added a tie wall and walk way on the right side.

Cris Abbott, a local contractor, did the work at a very reasonable price. Additionally Cris piped all of our downspouts away from the house.  The balance of the project included the normal things you would expect in a house with deferred maintenance; a new roof, siding repair, new gutters, exterior paint, and we had to side the utility building before painting.

On the inside new light fixtures, plumbing fixtures, new HVAC, plus appliances, painting, counter tops and new vanity tops plus refinishing the hardwoods completed the make over.

By the way; if you have extra money now is a good time to pick up some REALLY GOOD DEALS to resell or to rent out.

Van Purser is a licensed real estate broker in Georgia.  Since1981 he has successfully purchased and renovated over 400 homes.  His expertise is in the area of foreclosures, rehabs and fixer uppers.  Additionally, he has represented hundreds of clients over the years as a broker with Metro Brokers, RE/Max and now with his own firm.  He and his wife, Jeanne, who is also a broker, have been married since 1977.  Van can be reached at 770-623-3313 or by email VanPurser@VanPurser.com

Tools for viewing foreclosures

November 29, 2010

With all of the foreclosures and great deals on the market having the right tools on hand when looking at a property can save you lots of time and money. By knowing the tools and by having them on hand, you will be able to properly evaluate a home on the first visit, resulting in being able to make an offer afterwards, without the assistance of an inspector or engineer, and without needing to return for a second or third visit prior to making an offer.  This alone will allow you to make offers more quickly and will result in more deals going under contract.

A Flash Light
I can’t tell you the number of times would be buyers show up with a pin light on their key ring to look at property.  A heavy duty flash will allow you to examine attics, crawl spaces and basements.  In many case houses do not have utility service on, so no power and no lights.  Additionally, a heavy duty flash light can provide a defense to any one who may be in a home who should not be there.

A Collapsible Ladder
This should be a no brainer.  Many of the collapsible ladders will fit in a trunk, and when extended will provide access to many ranch, split level and split foyer roofs. In addition they are great for entering small attic accesses which do not have pull down stairs.

Binoculars
This is a great tool to have.  It allows you to see from the ground many of the things that you can not see unless you actually get on the roof.  Additionally, it allows you to take a very close look at soffits, gutters, window sills, and of course chimneys.  Just be careful and don’t be looking too closely at the neighbors homes or you may get in trouble.

A Probe
The one I like to have is home made.  Crafted (if you can call it that) from an extend-able painters pole.  Cut the roller holder portion of the paint roller off with a hack saw, and straighten it, you will then have an extend-able probe with approximately a 12-14 inch heavy steel pointed rod on the end of it.  This makes probing around foundations to detect soft spots or cavities in soil a breeze.  Additionally, it provides the ability to extend your reach to test for damaged siding and wood as well as first story gutters.

Camera or Phone for Photos
If you’re like I me, sometimes if I look at several homes I may get them confused.  Taking a few photos will help me recall the property and remember some to the more critical items associated with each property.

25’ & 100’ Tape Measures
Ok the 25’ tape will be used the most. for items such as counter tops, floor covering, windows, and the list go on and on.

The 100′ tape comes in handy for roofs, gutters, some decks, fences and driveways.

An Old Credit Card or Flexible Putty Knife
Talk about a time saver, this is huge.  I can’t tell you how many times I have gone out to look at house and there was no lock box, which means no key. By having one or both of these tools you will more than likely be able to push the edge between the door and door frame so that as you slide it down it will compress the door latch, allowing for the door to open.  Talk about a time saver, another trip out could be at least two hours and another day, and might cause you to miss the cut off time for an offer.

A Marble & a 4’ Level
OK, I know it sounds stupid, but using a marble is a great way to quickly determine if a floor is not level.  Believe me, you set it down on tile or hardwood and if it takes off, you better take a closer look at the structure below.

As for the 4’ level, it too is great for determining if floors are level and if door frames and walls are plumb.  I find it very helpful in checking out block or poured wall foundations for deflection or leaning.  Oh yea, it is great for determining if chimneys are pulling away excessively from exterior walls.

A Couple of the Basics
Don’t’ forget a pair of pliers and a can of WD-40.  The pliers are great for pulling up edges of carpet to see if hardwoods are underneath, and the WD 40 is great for spraying door knobs and keys so that they will actually unlock the doors.  You can’t depend on anything working the way it should.

Have fun with the tools we have discussed.  And do know, I am not suggesting or advocating your use of these tools in the ways I have described, however if you choose to use them in a similar way, I can assure you, you will save time and money.

Flip This House

August 24, 2010

One of our recent flips was a ranch on a full basement in Alpharetta.  The home had been lived in for a number of years by the then current owner.  The home needed updating to bring up the value, but it was mostly cosmetic in nature.  We thought it was about time to get one that did not need so much work.  Check it out.

On the outside we replaced the roof with an architectural roof, removed the LP siding, replaced it with HARDI Plank and repainted the exterior.  This made a huge difference in the exterior appearance, and did not represent a huge cost.  We also had to water proof a portion of the front foundation wall.  This required bringing in a back hoe, digging down to the footer, filling cracks in the block wall and then applying water proofing before covering it back up.  I would prefer not to have to do this again. Once finished we added concrete curbing to create a very attractive and curb appealing front yard.  At $3.50 a linear foot the curbing was a great investment.

On the inside we painted, replaced the majority of light and plumbing fixtures, replace kitchen appliances and added a Heat Pump and duct work in the basement so that we could consider that finished space.  At less than $4,000 it was a good investment.

In the end we sold the house for more than any other ranch had sold for in the subdivision.  If you have extra money; now is a great time to purchase investment property; AND if you need someone to manage the project from Alpha to Omega, give me a call.