Posts Tagged ‘derogatory credit’

Credit scores on the rise

September 11, 2018

Some consumers credit scores are going up! A recent overhaul in the way the major credit bureaus factor in negative credit information is prompting millions of consumers’ credit scores to rise. The main reason? The removal of some collection items.

Over the past 12 months, collection items were removed from eight million consumers’ credit reports. The NY Federal Reserve said consumers who had at least one collection item/account removed from their credit reports saw on average an 11-point increase to their scores. Why the change in collection items being part of the credit score? Some collection categories often have mistakes/errors that lower potential buyers credit scores and keep them out of the borrowing market.

The three main bureaus (Equifax, Experian PLC, and TransUnion) all agreed to rework credit reports reports stemming from a 2015 settlement. In the settlement, some of the collection items removed were non-loan related items such as gym memberships, library fines, traffic tickets, and some instances of medical debt. This change would not include credit cards or loan related accounts. Those type of accounts that enter into a collection category will still negatively impact a potential home buyer’s credit score. any firms agreed to remove some non-loan related items that were sent to collection firms, such as gym memberships, library fines, and traffic tickets. They also agreed to strike medical-debt collections that have been paid by a patient’s insurance company. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, those seeing the biggest boost to their credit scores are those with a score in the mid 600s.

This is a great move by the credit bureaus. Sometimes it is easier to prove that one owes money with the account in good standing, and harder to prove one no longer owes a debt. Some debts such as tax liens, credit card collections, back taxes, car/student loans in default, etc. are easier to prove the debt is actually in arrears. Arguing about a library account in a city one may have lived in 5 years ago becomes troubling and difficult to prove. While these accounts aren’t being removed from a credit report/history, they are being ignored when it comes to producing the credit score.

Mortgage life after a derogatory credit event

February 14, 2017

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

An unforeseen event takes place… a medical event, job loss, divorce, death of a spouse… before you know it, bills are piling up and they never seem to end. Eventually this buildup could result in a bankruptcy, foreclosure, short sale… a major derogatory credit event. Once it is over, will you ever be able to buy a home again?

The answer is yes. During the housing boom, someone could apply for a loan the day after completing a bankruptcy. Let’s just say guidelines are different now, but not insurmountable. Most people assume there is a 7-year wait after something as big as a bankruptcy or foreclosure. That is true if you are looking to qualify for a Jumbo loan (any loan amount over $424,100). On the other hand, if you are looking to buy a home for say $350,000 with the minimum down payment, is it still a 7-year wait?

No, definitely not.

This post will focus on conventional loans. Next time, we’ll discuss government loans.

What are the waiting periods? Using today’s guidelines*:

  • Chapter 7 bankruptcy: requires a 4-year wait
  • Chapter 13 bankruptcy: requires a 2-year wait from the discharge date, but 4 years from the dismissal date if the Chapter 13 bankruptcy application isn’t accepted by the courts
  • Multiple bankruptcy filings: 5-year wait
  • Foreclosure: 7 years unless the home was included in a bankruptcy filing. In that case, it drops from 7 to 4 years
  • Other: There is a 4-year wait for a deed-in-lieu of foreclosure, short sale, or the sale of a home during the foreclosure process

*Those are Fannie Mae guidelines. Technically, Freddie Mac does not have minimum waiting period. Underwriting goes by the Automated Underwriting Services findings from Freddie Mac. That said, the “findings” often mirror the guidelines of Fannie Mae. 

In only one of these instances is there a 7-year waiting period. That would be if there was a foreclosure on a home that was not included in a bankruptcy. In every other situation, one could be ready to purchase a home much sooner than 7 years. Government loans are much more forgiving, but conventional loans are to be used in situations where a borrower doesn’t qualify for a VA or FHA loan (more on that next week). Also, the maximum loan amounts on FHA loans are lower than conventional loans, so the purchase price could also play into determining which loan program to use.

Have you filed a bankruptcy, but want to own a home again? You don’t have to wait seven years. If you have re-established credit to a qualifying score, buying a home can come sooner than you think. Unsure of your situation? Purchasing a home in Georgia? If yes to both, contact me today. We can start the prequalification process and see how quickly we can get you into a new home.

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