Posts Tagged ‘atlanta home ownership’

Still cheaper to own than rent

May 21, 2019

The trend continues – especially in Atlanta – it is cheaper to own than rent.

With the latest housing push over the past few years, homebuyers have fared better than those who continue to rent. In the recent CoreLogic report:

  • On average, renters tend to be more cost-burdened than homeowners
  • Across the US, monthly rents continue to rise.
  • Home loan payments and associated home ownership costs are lower.

Another stat from the study shows the rental index is up 36% from during the during the housing boom through today, yet home loan payments are down just shy of 5% over the same time period. The study looked at twelve metro areas. On average the rent increases ranged from 20-60% while reporting a drop in the home loan payments anywhere from 3-24%. Lastly, these are sound loans being issued today. With a combination of income growth during the economic recovery, home values appreciating, and sound underwriting guidelines, delinquency rates are lower than they’ve been in decades.

So what is preventing potential buyers from purchasing a home? Often it is misinformation. Too many people feel you must have 20% down to purchase a home (one can buy with as little as 3% down), perfect credit (loan approval can be obtained with a score as low as 620), and no debt (debt to income ratios can be as high as 50% for conventional loans and 55% on FHA loans). This is simply not true. Owing a home with a small down payment, below average credit, and other debt is easier than most imagine.

Contact me today. If the home you are looking to buy a home in the state of Georgia, you can be ready to purchase in as little as a 10 minute phone call. We can also start the process online. It can be that easy!

 

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Mortgage rates continue to improve

December 20, 2018

The federal reserve completed their fourth rate hike of the Federal Funds Rate this week. Guess that means mortgage rates are up? Nope! They are not. Mortgage rates have improved.

In fact, mortgage rates improved by over a half a point better coming off their 2018 highs in early November. Why? This blog covers the topic often, but not often enough as a lot of people believe mortgage rates flow with the actions of the Federal Reserve.

While mortgage rates may get worse when the Federal Reserve raises the Federal Funds Rate, mortgage rates themselves are actually determined by the value of mortgage backed security bonds. As these bond prices go up, mortgage rates go down (and vice versa). The Federal Funds rate impacts rates on car loans, credit cards, and home equity lines (second mortgages). We’ve seen those rates get higher this year as the Fed raised rates a full point in 2018.

What is causing mortgage rates to improve? It’s the usual suspects:

  • When mortgage rates were at their yearly high, stocks were at an all time high. Since the Dow his 26,800, it has lost 4,000 points (15% of its value) as of this blog post. Money is coming out of stocks and going into bonds. As bond prices go up, mortgage rates go down. It’s no coincidence rates were at their highest point of 2018 when the Dow was just like rates are now improving as the Dow pulls back.
  • Stocks are slowing their historic run due to bad economic news. There are signs the economy is potentially headed toward a recession (some believe it will happen in 2019). Bad economic news sends investors from higher risk/higher reward stocks into the safer investment/less reward bond market.
  • The Federal Funds Rate itself – as it moves higher, inflation is slowed. Mortgage rates hate inflation, and combating inflation is a way to help mortgage rates improve.

What to do with this rate improvement? If buying a home, rates are still low and headed back near their levels at the start of 2018. Purchasing a home with these improved rates gives the buyer a 6% increase on their purchase price. Now is a great time to start looking. The spring market for buyers/buying power is already upon us. If you’ve considered doing a refinance to pay off an equity line whose rate is going up and up this year, now is a much better time to consider making this move.

Owning or buying a home in Georgia? Ready for that mortgage conversation? Contact me today, and we’ll get started!

The end of the seller’s market

October 2, 2018

I know it seems we are stuck in a seller’s market. It feels like an eternity at this point! I’ll be back to that theme in a moment, but right now… If you have been putting off buying a home because of fierce competition, now is a good time to look at the market again. Homes are staying on the market longer now than they have all year. There are fewer buyers out looking to purchase a home. This is the best opportunity for buyers so far in 2018!

Regarding 2018 as a whole though, and back to the theme of this post, there are too few homes on the market for the number of buyers wanting to own a home. Sellers tend to receive multiple offers, and can be picky when it comes to whom they choose to sell their home. According to a recent study by Zillow, the market will balance out in the near future.

Zillow’s study says there are signs that the inventory levels are beginning to get better (as I mentioned above), but the country is still dealing with the fallout of limited new construction over several years during the Great Recession. Expect to see conditions continue improving over the next year, and around 2020, Zillow expects the market to become a buyer’s market again. By then, Zillow expects new construction will have caught up to demand. As people move from their existing homes into the new construction, it will put more homes on the market for other people to buy/enter the home ownership market.

It is coming… not as quick as we may like it, but a more balanced market is on its way. In the meantime:

  • Remember there are a lot of myths out there when it comes to buying a home. For example, you do NOT need 20% down to purchase a home. For more on this, check out my previous post.
  • There are things buyers can do to make their offers more competitive. For more on this, check out Rodney Shaffer’s recent post.

Better days are coming, but that doesn’t mean you have to wait another year. If you are buying in the state of Georgia, contact me today. I can help you get prequalified to purchase your home, and we can discuss the variety of options to make your offer more competitive in this market.

 

Government impact on housing

August 7, 2018

Sometimes the government gets involved in areas, and things get worse. Here is one area where inaction would be really bad – flood insurance.

On the last possible day, Congress avoided a lapse in the federal flood insurance program when the Senate voted to extend the program through the end of November. The National Flood Insurance Program would have expired July 31 without this action. So the program has been extended, but still doesn’t include any reforms to the program. Despite years of debate and proposals to reform the program, reforms have stalled. In lieu of any changes, Congress has kicked the can down the road another few months. We’ll get to do all of this again in a few months.

This isn’t a case of “they’ll do anything to prevent a lapse of flood insurance coverage.” Congress has let the national flood insurance program lapse some in the past few years. Here is hoping the next change/extension/reform won’t be at the very last minute, but something tells me it will be.

In other mortgage news from the government, it appears the current set up for FHA mortgage insurance will remain the same. There will be no decrease in the monthly premium AND the insurance will still be permanent for the life of the loan.  FHA’s insurance program works differently from private mortgage insurance, which typically falls off after a certain amount of time.

The FHA’s policy wasn’t always this way. The FHA’s previous policy required borrowers to pay mortgage insurance premiums until the outstanding principal balance reaches 78% of the original home value, but the FHA instituted the life of loan policy back in 2013. This action was part of the effort to improve the status of their mortgage insurance fund. While there were some good years of rebuilding the fund, the decline of the funds balance in 2017 caused FHA to pause in potential changes to mortgage insurance.

Currently, the mortgage insurance is so high on FHA loans that it rarely makes sense for a borrower to consider using an FHA loan unless they have really low credit and/or a very high debt threshold. Good credit, low debt, but short on the down payment? Conventional loans allow only a 3% down payment (compared to FHA’s 3.5% down payment). Hopefully FHA can update their mortgage insurance policy in the near future to provide more options for well qualified borrowers.

Looking to buy a home before the end of the year? Ready to have a new home for the holidays?!? If you are purchasing in Georgia, contact me today. I’ll get you ready to make an offer in one quick phone call.

Changes to loan guidelines

May 15, 2018

Guidelines for getting approval on a home loan can seem like a moving target – they always seem to be changing. While that isn’t true, technically, what is true is this… there are so many guidelines in terms of a buyer’s qualifications (assets, credit, income, etc.) that small changes do tend to happen often. Here are some changes that we may have missed.

IRS Tax Payment plans – this one can be handy when looking to buy a home BUT a larger-than-expected tax bill comes due. As long as there is not a federal tax lien filed, the borrower can move forward with the home purchase using an accepted IRS tax payment plan. The borrower would provide the monthly tax payment, proof of IRS tax payment plan acceptance, and the reminder payment coupon for the second payment. Only one payment needs to be made. In regards to qualifying, the monthly payment is calculated as if it were any other debt such as a monthly car payment, student loan payment, etc.

Sourcing funds – all of those cash or check deposits made into a bank account… during the crash, it seemed we would need to document any deposit that was over $100. It was a nightmare. Fortunately, it has relaxed now. The guideline is any deposit that is less than half of monthly income can be ignored. This means the number of deposits that need to be documented dramatically decreased. One caveat to this is the number of deposits. If no individual deposit is over half of monthly income, but there are multiple deposits adding up to over half of the monthly income, and underwriter can request all of the deposits be documented to ensure no one gave our home buyer extra money as an incentive to purchase the home. While this caveat can be used by an underwriter, it is rare.

Liquidating retirement funds – in some cases (depending on the amount being liquidating and/or loan program), we no longer need to document the liquidation of retirement assets for funds to close. We just need to show the money exists and is accessible to our borrower.

IRS Tax Transcripts – we’ll begin and end with the IRS… IRS tax transcripts are no longer required in a majority of loan situations now. There are some programs that still require it, but tax transcripts are no longer ordered for every single loan. This helps speed up the process of buying a home. Over the past few years during the IRS busy season (think April 15th and Oct 15th), getting copies of transcripts could be delayed. That, in turn, could cause delays for getting loan approval.

In all of these examples, the requirements for loan approval has lightened up some from the housing crash, which is especially helpful during the home buying process.

Wanting to buy a home this year? Looking in the state of Georgia? If so, contact me! I can get you prequalified and well on your way to owning your new home.

 

Conforming Loan Limits going up!

December 5, 2017

For the first time since 2006, there is a significant increase in the conventional loan limit. The new maximum loan amount for conventional loans will be $453,100. Technically there was an increase from 2016 to 2017 (from $417,000 to $424,100, which is less than a 2% increase). This time the maximum limit gets a more significant increase.

What does this mean?

Buyers can purchase a $477,000 home with only a 5% down payment. If using a 3% down conventional loan, then the buyer can purchase a home as high as $467,000 in value. Prior to the increase, if a buyer wanted to purchase a home at $500,000 and avoid a Jumbo loan, then the down payment needed to be 15% to get the loan down to $424,100. Now a $500,000 home can be purchased with less than a 10% down payment.

This increases the purchase power for home buyers, and these new conventional loan limits can be used now! The start date for the conforming loan limit increase is January 2018, but the loan process can start today and close after the start of the new year!

Looking to buy a home in the state of Georgia? Wanting to use a conventional loan to purchase $500,000 or so home using a small down payment? Now you can! Contact me today and we’ll get going on your new home!

 

Homebuyers squeezed out of the market

June 13, 2017

Last week there were a series of articles published by the Wall Street Journal, CNN Money, and more describing how Millennials are being squeezed out of buying homes. For the most part, articles focused solely on lending requirements. Honestly, that misses the mark on what is really going on out there right now. Let’s dig into this a little more.

The articles primarily focused on how lending guidelines are stricter. While that is true when compared to 2007, lending requirements have loosened up quite a bit over the past several years. Here are some quick examples:

  • Conventional loans allow borrowers with a credit score of 620 (the same as FHA). Average credit is 660-680 depending on what article/source you read, so home buyers with below average credit can qualify to purchase a home.
  • Smaller down payments are back. VA and USDA loans do not require a down payment, FHA only requires 3.5% down, and Conventional loans can be used to buy a home with as little as 3% down.
  • Self-employed borrowers with an established business of 5+ years can qualify to buy a home with only one year of tax returns.
  • Condos can be purchased with as little as 3% down.
  • Rental income from investment properties can be used even if the property hasn’t been rented out for two years.

Lending guidelines are much more lenient today than they were just a few years ago. That isn’t really the problem.

A Washington Post article from January discussed the elephant in the room, and nailed it when it comes to the issue that all home buyers are facing – inventory.

I attended a Realtor meeting recently where a stat was given stating there is less than a 3-month supply of homes available in in-town Atlanta. A balanced market is a 6-month supply, and nationwide the supply of homes is well under 6 months. That’s not good. Think it is bad in Atlanta? It’s worse in Seattle. The lack of inventory puts Millennials (and any home buyer with a smaller down payment) at a disadvantage. Also, it is pushing home values higher than a normal market due to the impact of supply and demand.

How does one compete in this market? A few things come to mind.

  1. Home buyers must go out and look at homes as soon as they are listed. This can be difficult depending on one’s schedule, but homes are going under contract in a few days in most cases.
  2. Home buyers should be underwritten prior to going out to look at a home. This way the offer letter isn’t a prequalification letter or pre-approval letter, but the letter can read the home buyers are “approved to purchase a home pending a satisfactory appraisal, clear title, and sufficient insurance coverage.” That is much stronger than a simple “prequalification” letter, and I go into more detail this in a previous blog post.

By planning and being ready to move on a home at a moment’s notice, home buyers can increase their odds of getting under contract on a home.

Looking to purchase in Georgia? Wanting to get ahead of the game? Contact me today, and we’ll get started toward achieving the goal of your home ownership!

VA Jumbo Loans

April 25, 2016

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The VA program for jumbo loans is excellent.  A quick definition here – a jumbo loan in Georgia is defined as a loan with a principal amount of more than $417,000.

The first benefit is that you can get a VA jumbo loan with a lower down payment than a conventional jumbo loan.  The minimum down payment for a conventional jumbo is 10% of the total loan amount.  The minimum down payment for a VA jumbo is 5% of only the amount above the jumbo threshold of $417,000.

So if your veteran friend David wants to buy a house priced at $517,000, his minimum down payment options are (1) $51,700 for a conventional loan or (2) only $5,000 for a VA loan.

(Anybody else remember this catchy recruiting jingle from the early 1980’s?)

And veterans like David can get a VA jumbo loan with a credit score as low as 680.  Our minimum credit score for a conventional jumbo is 720.

Lastly, David can get a much lower interest rate on a VA jumbo – perhaps even ¾% lower than with a conventional loan.  Interest rates on VA jumbo loans are comparable to conventional non-jumbo mortgage rates.  So David will save a lot of money every month by obtaining a VA jumbo loan.

Note that VA jumbo loans still require paying the VA funding fee.  But even with the fee, VA jumbo mortgages are a great product – they make buying a house more affordable than most other jumbo loan alternatives.  If you are a veteran or if you know a veteran friend or family-member who wants to buy a high-priced home in Georgia, call or email me at Dunwoody Mortgage Services.  We can discuss loan options and help you obtain all the great VA loan benefits you have earned with your service.  We love serving military veterans.  Delivering great loans with excellent service is a small way that we can say “thank you” to those who have served.

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