Posts Tagged ‘3% down conventional loan’

New FHA max loan limit

December 12, 2019

In early December, I mentioned the maximum loan amount for conventional loans will increase from $484,350 to $510,400 in 2020. FHA followed suit and increase their maximum loan amounts.

One thing to remember about the maximum FHA loan amount is the amount varies from county to county. The max loan is based on the average home values in each market. The loan amount range across the US goes from $331,760 to $765,600.

To find your area, you can use the search tool created by HUD. Be sure to change the Limit Year from “CY2019” to “CY2020” in order to see the new maximum amounts.

For the Atlanta metro area, the new maximum FHA loan amount will be $401,350. This is about a 5% increase over the current limit of $379,500. With these increases, a buyer can now purchase a home in metro Atlanta:

As we celebrate the new year, it is also time to celebrate more buying power in the housing market!

Are you thinking about buying a home in 2020? Want to get a head start? I’m already working with clients who are ready to purchase home. The spring market has started! If you are buying a home in the state of Georgia, contact me today. You can be ready to make an offer on a home in no time at all.

The mysterious case of home ownership

July 9, 2019

Home buyers continue to make assumptions (most of which are bad) when it comes to buying a home. Meaning, the options for education for buying a home are not as good as they should be.

That is why you have The Mortgage Blog!

This misinformation is undoubtedly holding some back from even looking to try and purchase a home. Let’s take a look at a recent survey by Fannie Mae to see some of the false assumptions buyers have about purchasing a home:

  • most buyers assume the minimum credit score is higher than what is actually required to qualify
  • most buyers assume the down payment is higher than what is actually required as a minimum down payment
  • few home buyers are aware of low down payment programs such as Fannie Mae Home Ready requiring only 3% down

Under these assumptions, many potential buyers assume home ownership isn’t even an option and therefor do not do any further investigating into possibilities of buying a home.

The Mortgage Blog has covered all of these topics and more:

The Mortgage Blog has your back! Reading over these, one will learn a large down payment is not needed to buy a home (as little as 3% down on a conventional loan and 3.5% on an FHA loan), perfect credit is not required (down to 620 on FHA and conventional and sometimes as low as 580 on FHA), and there are programs out there for first time home buyers.

Been wanting to own a home but confused at all of the misinformation out there? Just want a straight answer or two? Contact me! I will be happy to answer your questions about home ownership. If you are looking to buy in the state of Georgia, I can get you prequalified and on your way to owning a home!

Inventory levels still low

February 21, 2019

If you think you’ve heard this before… it is because you have. Inventory levels are still low across the country. Low inventory levels push home values up due to the simple application of supply-and-demand. This is one of the main reasons home values have jumped so much in the past couple of years. How did we get here? There are a couple of reasons:

  • During the Great Recession, very few homes were being built. After many years of very little new construction (coupled with more people wanting to buy homes), a squeeze on inventory occurred.
  • While unemployment was high during the Great Recession, many people put off buying a home until their financial situation was more stable. This creates a pent up demand on those wanting to buy homes. This increases competition for the few homes available on the market.
  • Homeowners are remaining in their homes longer. We are at the highest rate of owners keeping their homes in 18 years. The length of time is now up to 7 years, which is a 10% increase year over year.

There are many reasons why people may choose to remain in their homes longer (they have a low rate on their current home, fear of finding their new home, tighter loan qualifying guidelines), but one new factor are baby boomers choosing to live/age in place. As baby boomers remain in their current homes (instead of down sizing or moving into assisted living), it again tightens the amount of available inventory. Of course, this will not always be the case. Baby boomers (along with the silent generation) own over 50% of the homes in America. As they age, we may find ourselves in the exact opposite situation – too much inventory.

Until we get there, how can someone make their offer stand out? There are a couple of things to do.

  1. Make a non-contingent offer on the purchase. For those who own their current home, qualifying to carry two mortgages means an offer can be made without a contingency. A seller with multiple offers would find that more attractive. Homes are going fast, so it is not very likely one would carry both home loans for an extended period of time. For those who need equity from the current home for the down payment on the new home, there is always the method of recasting the loan after closing. A future post will cover recasting.
  2. Get pre-underwritten prior to making an offer. In this method, the buyer applies for the home loan with a “to be determined” property address. Once approved, the offer letter to a seller simply says the buyer is ready to close pending an appraisal and final underwriting approval. This is a quick close and the seller knows the buyer is legitimate. Rodney Shaffer covers this more in-depth with this post.
  3. For first time home buyers (and repeat buyers too), look to use Home Ready. This is a conventional loan requiring only a 3% down payment. Some sellers would prefer not accepting an FHA offer, so Home Ready allows for a smaller down payment than FHA (3% vs 3.5%), and is still a conventional loan. Couple this with the “pre-underwrite” option and have even more power behind potential offers. There are conventional loans with only 3% down that are not Home Ready loans, but Home Ready has some advantages over the “standard” 3% down conventional loan that buyers would want to take advantage of if they qualify. Here is a case study on a Home Ready loan.

Yes, it is a tight market when it comes to available homes to purchase. That doesn’t mean buyers should despair. There are ways to help make the offer more attractive to sellers. Looking to buy in the state of Georgia? If so, contact me today. We can start talking about any or all of these potential options.

 

New FHA max loan limit

January 8, 2019

Just as conforming loan limits rose again this year, the maximum loan amount for FHA loans got a bit higher too.

Remember the maximum loan amount for FHA loans vary from county to county; meaning, the max loan amount is determined by the county in which the property resides.

  • The new FHA loan limit for 2019 is $379,500 for the metro Atlanta area.
  • The non-metro max loan amount also increased to $314,827.
  • Georgia also has some counties with max amounts between those ranges (for example, Clarke county is $341,550).

For those who want to see their specific county, use this lookup tool provided by HUD. Just choose your state and county then press “send” to get the exact amount.

The new limit for metro Atlanta counties means a buyer could purchase a $393,000 home and make just a 3.5% down payment. Buyers can look to purchase a home for more than $393,000, but they will need to make a larger down payment. For example, a person could buy a $400,000 home using an FHA loan. Since the max loan is capped at $379,500, the down payment will need to be about 5% instead of the minimum 3.5%.

I know what you may be thinking… why put 5% down and use an FHA loan? Wouldn’t a conventional loan be better? True. Maybe. Remember for those with credit scores under 680 who make a 5% down payment, the private mortgage insurance for a conventional loan is higher than the monthly mortgage insurance for an FHA. Also, the mortgage rate is higher for the conventional loan versus the FHA loan.

This is why it is imperative to speak with a licensed mortgage lender about the differences in loan programs instead of assuming an FHA loan is only for first time home buyers OR never consider an FHA loan if you can make a 5% down payment. The specific details of each client’s situation could make one program more attractive than the other even if it goes against what most people would consider normal.

Looking to purchase a home in the state of Georgia? Unsure of the loan program that is right for you? Contact me today. I can get you prequalified for a home loan in a few minutes, and we’ll discuss the pros and cons of each loan program to ensure the best fit for your situation.

Conforming loan limits rise (again!)

December 4, 2018

For the third year in a row, conforming loan limits are increasing.

  • In 2017, the limit increased from $417,000 to $424,100.
  • In 2018, the limit increased to $453,100.
  • In 2019, the new conforming loan limit will be $484,350.

Over three years, the max limit has increased by roughly 16%. This is quite a change as the limit stayed at 417,000 from 2006-2016. One thing though, I gotta say, what is the deal with no rounding up or down?!? I think it would be a lot easier to just say $453,000 or $484,000. Is the extra $350 going to make that big of a difference? Oh well…

Why the increase? Conforming loan limits are set by the Housing and Economic Recovery Act passed in 2008. This set the baseline loan limit of $417,000, and stated this baseline cannot increase until home prices return to pre-housing decline levels. With home prices still on the rise across the country, it is fitting the limit increased. Now a home buyer can purchase a $500,000 with roughly a 3% down payment. This opens up more homes for buyers who have stable jobs/strong income, but may be lacking in assets for a larger down payment. Congratulations!

We can also expect FHA mortgage limits to rise too. Currently for metro Atlanta, the limit is $359,950 (again, round up. Is $50 going to make that big of a difference :-). If we see a similar increase in 2019 as we did in 2018, expect the new FHA loan limit in metro Atlanta to be roughly $385,000. Expect a new blog post once FHA makes the official announcement.

Higher loan limits are great for consumers as housing prices continue to rise due to demand and low inventory levels. Looking to buy a new home in the new year? Is that home in Georgia? If yes, contact me today. I can get you prequalified in a matter of minutes and on your way to making an offer in no time!

Education is the key to home ownership

July 10, 2018

My colleague, Rodney Shaffer, is putting together a series on the advantages of home ownership. There are four posts as of this entry. They all focus on how home ownership, over time, provides a solid return in investment along with stabilizing/increasing the home owners own net worth.  Those are very good reasons to consider home ownership, but there is still on major hurdle for potential home buyers.

Many potential homebuyers are not aware of the realities of getting a mortgage and may be putting off their purchase because of it.

A new survey from FDIC-insured bank Laurel Road asked college-educated Americans about their homebuying plans. The poll found many misconceptions about the housing market and arranging financing, with down payments, interest rates, and affordability all weighing on potential buyers. The survey found that almost half of respondents are unaware of alterative down payment requirements; instead, believing that 20% down is barrier to their homeownership dreams. This is fundamentally untrue. Conventional loans require as little as 3% down and this is not limited to first time home buyers. FHA loans only require 3.5% down.

There is also a misconception about interest rates with many thinking they will hit 6% by year-end and believing they’ve missed out. This is also untrue. The Mortgage Bankers Association forecast for year end is just 4.6%, which is about where rates sit now. Why do people think mortgage rates will continue to rise? While mortgage rates can rise, most believe they will rise exponentially due to the Federal Reserve raising rates. The Federal Reserve raising rates doesn’t directly impact mortgage rates (it does impact home equity lines, car loan rates, credit card rates, etc.). This blog has discussed ad nauseam the fact that mortgage rates are not directly tied to the Federal Reserve raising rates. Recent examples can be found here, here and here. For the full list of entries dealing with this topic, check out this link. It is a lot of posts.

In reality, you STILL do not need 20% down in order to qualify to purchase a home. While rates are higher in 2018 versus previous years, they are not anywhere close to 6%. Don’t get mortgage rates confused with prime rate (that is over 5% and will be closer to 6% by the end of the year. Prime rate and mortgage rates are not the same thing!

Wanting to buy a home in Georgia but don’t have 20% down? Not a problem! Contact me today, and I can help you toward owning your new home!

Conforming Loan Limits going up!

December 5, 2017

For the first time since 2006, there is a significant increase in the conventional loan limit. The new maximum loan amount for conventional loans will be $453,100. Technically there was an increase from 2016 to 2017 (from $417,000 to $424,100, which is less than a 2% increase). This time the maximum limit gets a more significant increase.

What does this mean?

Buyers can purchase a $477,000 home with only a 5% down payment. If using a 3% down conventional loan, then the buyer can purchase a home as high as $467,000 in value. Prior to the increase, if a buyer wanted to purchase a home at $500,000 and avoid a Jumbo loan, then the down payment needed to be 15% to get the loan down to $424,100. Now a $500,000 home can be purchased with less than a 10% down payment.

This increases the purchase power for home buyers, and these new conventional loan limits can be used now! The start date for the conforming loan limit increase is January 2018, but the loan process can start today and close after the start of the new year!

Looking to buy a home in the state of Georgia? Wanting to use a conventional loan to purchase $500,000 or so home using a small down payment? Now you can! Contact me today and we’ll get going on your new home!

 

Home Buying Preparations – Down Payment

January 19, 2016

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Wrapping up a blog post series to help you keep the new year’s resolution to purchase a new home in 2016. In the first post, we talked about how important it is to know “how” you are paid (in addition to “how much”). Next, we dispelled the rumor that a low credit score means a bad interest rate. That isn’t necessarily true. Today, we’ll finish up with the down payment.

I have written countless posts about how much of a down payment is needed to buy a home. Can you guess how much? If you’ve read this blog in the past, you know that the answer isn’t 20% down. Just like the credit score requirements differs depending on the loan program, so does the down payment requirements. In order to buy a home, you’ll need:

  • 5% down for a conventional loan (3% is also possible if a borrower qualifies)
  • 3.5% for an FHA loan
  • No down payment on a VA loan

When making less than a 20% down payment, there will be PMI (Private Mortgage Insurance) on the loan unless it is a VA loan. There are some differences in mortgage insurance between conventional and FHA loans. Here are some quick notes on them.

  • FHA loans have an up front mortgage insurance premium. The monthly PMI is required regardless of the down payment (even if you put 20% or more down). If making the minimum down payment, FHA mortgage insurance is permanent. The monthly amount is set on a factor of 0.85% of the loan amount regardless of the amount down or the borrower’s credit score. For more information on FHA mortgage insurance, check out this previous post from the Mortgage Blog.
  • Conventional loan mortgage insurance is determined by the amount of the down payment and the credit score. Conventional loans have a sliding scale on the factor determining the monthly PMI. The more down AND the higher the credit score, the lower the factor goes (and vice versa). The mortgage insurance isn’t permanent, and there is no up front premium. For more information on conventional loan mortgage insurance, check out this video post.
  • Conventional loans also have a Lender Paid Mortgage Insurance (LPMI) program. Using this loan, a borrower agrees to a higher interest rate in exchange for no monthly mortgage insurance payment. For more details on this program, read this post from 2015.

If you take nothing else away from this post, please remember that regardless of what you hear on the news OR read on the web, you do not need 20% down to buy a home. I promise! If you are looking to buy a home in the state of Georgia, I can prequalify you today for a home purchase without needing 20% down.

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You Can Do It!! Part 3

July 27, 2015

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Let’s finalize our mortgage myth busting process right now.  We have previously exploded myths regarding the character and capital criteria in mortgage lending.  Now let’s deal with myths regarding your “capacity” to obtain a mortgage.

When it comes to loans, the term “capacity” is your ability to make your monthly payments.  To determine your capacity to pay your mortgage, underwriters will compare your monthly gross income (before taxes, retirement, and other deductions) to all of your monthly debt payments.  If your debt payments are not too high relative to your income, you are deemed to have sufficient capacity to obtain the loan.

A surprising percentage of people believe that if they simply have a student loan – regardless of the amount – they cannot qualify for a mortgage.  The TRUTH here is that you can still qualify for a mortgage even if you do have a student loan (or an auto loan, or an auto lease, or credit cards, or other types of debt).

The critical question here is not IF you have a student loan, instead it is, “How large are your payments relative to your income?”  Underwriters will scrutinize your “back ratio,” which is the sum of all your monthly debt payments – student loans, auto loans, the new mortgage payment on that house you want, etc. – divided by your monthly gross income.

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As long as your back ratio is not too high, say 45% or less for a conventional loan and 50% or less for a FHA loan, you will likely have your loan approved (assuming no other underwriting “issues,” of course).

So let’s summarize the mortgage myth destroying logic with this:  if your credit score is 620 or higher, and you have (or can get from relatives) enough cash for a 3% or more down payment, and if your current monthly debt payments are not excessive, and you want to buy a house, then remember, “You can do it!”

Actually, I’ll correct this as you will need help from someone licensed to originate loans, so let’s just say, “We Can Do It!”  If you dream of owning your own home in the state of Georgia, give me a call and let’s discuss your situation.  I’ll be honest and tell you what the real situation is.  Don’t believe the myths and then wait to take action.  The TRUTH is we might be able to get you into your dream home sooner than you think.

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You Can Do It!! Part 2

July 21, 2015

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In my last post, we reviewed the fact that a high percentage of Americans want to own their own homes, and we looked at the first (“character”) of three primary criteria that lenders evaluate when underwriting loans.

The second important criteria you need to qualify for a mortgage is “capital.”  You must have some cash available to make a down payment.  The lender wants you to have some equity, some “skin in the game” when you purchase a new house; therefore, the requirement for a down payment.

But there are myths about down payments.  For example, a high percentage of recent survey respondents think that you must make a down payment of at least 20% to buy a house.  That is one big, FAT myth.  The TRUTH is that you can purchase a home with down payments as low as 3.5% for an FHA loan and 3% for a conventional loan.

Now keep in mind that, with conventional loans, larger down payments can earn you a better interest rate and a better premium on your mortgage insurance.  But you can obtain a mortgage with the low down payments mentioned above, you will just pay a little more for your lower down payment.

You will need to provide bank statements showing that you have the cash available for your down payment and the other cash you will need to close your loan – things like closing costs and prepaid escrow items.  In some cases, you may have to show “reserves,” extra cash available to cover future mortgage payments.

You can get these funds from your bank account, investment accounts, gifts from relatives, and, in some cases, you can borrow funds from retirement accounts (e.g., 401K).  Your Realtor can also negotiate for the home seller to contribute cash to help cover the closing costs and prepaids.

We’ll look at “capacity” and myths related to it in my next post.  But for now, if your credit score is 620 or higher, you have enough cash for a 3% or more down payment, and you want to buy a house, just remember, “You can do it!”  If you dream of owning your own home in the state of Georgia, give me a call and let’s discuss it.  Don’t believe the myths.  We might be able to get you into your dream home sooner than you think.

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