Archive for the ‘Loan Programs’ Category

Changes to the VA Funding Fee

October 31, 2019

There are a few certainties in life… death, taxes, leaves changing colors in the fall, and loan guidelines changing. Well, we have some new changes with VA loans pertaining to the funding fee. 

Currently the VA funding fee is as follows:
– 2.15% of the loan amount for first time usage and 3.3% subsequent use when making less than a 5% down payment. 
– 1.5% of the loan amount for first time usage and subsequent use when making a 5% down payment. 
– 1.25% of the loan amount for first time usage and subsequent use when making a 10% (or larger) down payment. 

The funding fees are slightly higher if the buyer is part of Reserves/National Guard vs being part of the regular military. 

Beginning in November the fees change to:
– 2.3% for first time use and 3.6% for subsequent use when making less than a 5% down payment. 
– 1.65% fee when making a 5% down payment
– 1.4% fee when making a 10% down payment. 

Some notes on this:
1. The increase is roughly 0.15 across the board. 
2. There are still funding fee exemptions for disabled veterans. 
3. There is now no difference between being in the regular military, reserves or national guard. 

Now I know a thought that may be going through the reader’s mind… the funding fee is going up. What is a funding fee?… great question!

VA loans do not have a monthly mortgage insurance payment. They do have an up front premium for obtaining the loan (similar to FHA loans). VA loans still do not have monthly mortgage insurance payments, the the funding fee (required on all VA loans unless the borrower is considered disabled) is going up. 

Are you a veteran living in Georgia looking to buy a home? Never considered using your VA eligibility? Maybe it makes sense. Maybe it doesn’t.  To find out, contact me today. There’s only one way you’ll know which loan program makes the most sense for you – asking the question. 

Millennial Home Ownership Survey

September 19, 2019

There are some interesting facts and observations in an August article documenting survey results from Millennial home buyers.  Here’s a link to the full study from lendedu.com.  1,000 people aged 23 to 38 participated in the survey.  Here are some survey results:

  • 58% of respondents say they own their own home.
  • 83% of these home owners obtained a mortgage to buy their home.
  • 75% of these mortgage holders obtained a FHA loan.
  • 16% is the average down payment percentage for the survey respondents.

To me, it is very surprising to me that such a high percentage of these home buyers used the FHA program, especially given the relatively high down payment percentage reported.  What I also find surprising is how the author treats FHA loans vis a vis the private mortgage insurance component of conventional mortgages.

Let’s look at the basics of FHA mortgage insurance (“MI”) vs. conventional (private) mortgage insurance (“PMI”).  FHA charges a 1.75% up-front MI.  On a $300,000 loan, that charge is $5,250.  Assuming a Millennial average 16% down payment, FHA charges a 0.80% monthly MI premium, which equals $200 per month.  And for this loan, the borrower must pay the monthly MI for 11 years.

For PMI on conventional loans, there is no up-front fee.  So our $300,000 mortgage holder is better off by $5,250 to start.  The PMI premium is based on the combination of down payment and the borrower’s credit score.  Let’s assume that a Millennial buyer (we’ll call her “Anna”) has a 680 credit score.  I calculate Anna’s monthly PMI premium at 0.26% or $65 per month.  In addition, the conventional loan PMI will cancel sooner than FHA MI, so Anna will pay conventional loan PMI for less than half the time she would pay FHA loan MI.

Summarizing this example, Anna with a 680 credit score would reap the following mortgage insurance benefits of choosing a conventional loan vs. FHA: (1) Anna saves $5,250 by not having the up-front FHA MI premium rolled into the loan amount; (2) Anna saves $135 per month with the lower PMI rate vs. the FHA MI rate; and (3) Anna stops making mortgage insurance payments way sooner.  And Anna’s PMI payment will be even lower if her credit score is in the 700’s.  From a mortgage insurance perspective, the conventional loan seems like a much better deal.

The author praises the use of FHA mortgages, then later makes the following statements about private mortgage insurance:

  • PMI should be avoided as it will usually cost the homeowner between 0.5% to 1% of the full mortgage amount….”
  • “…it is not great that so many are also paying for PMI as a result of less-than-optimal down payments…”

Such blanket negative statements about PMI concern me.  In our example, and many examples where the borrower has a strong credit score and can make a 10% or more down payment, the numbers often favor conventional loans.  FHA loans are often better when the borrower’s credit score is low or the borrower can only make a down payment of 10% or less.

The key lesson here is to consult a professional mortgage lender (I suggest that this guy for Georgia home buyers) to run the numbers for both FHA and conventional loans.  Then choose the best option given your circumstances.

Which Type of Mortgage To Use – Scenario 2

August 23, 2019

Now let’s change our buyer scenario. Both Jack and Diane want to make offers on a home, but this time they have 10% to put down. (Curious about a smaller down payment?  Take a look at the prior scenario with a 3.5% down payment.)  They still have the same qualifying credit scores of 680 for Jack and 795 for Diane.

With Jack’s 680 credit score, his monthly payment for a conventional loan (principal, interest, and mortgage insurance “MI”) would be $1,514.30. For a FHA loan, his payment would be $1,452.29. Given Jack’s credit score – even with the 10% down payment – FHA still delivers a better price, even though FHA loans have the draw backs of the up-front MI and the permanent monthly MI (assuming Congress does not change the law).

In this scenario with Jack’s 10% down payment, the mortgage insurance falls off after 11 years (even if Congress doesn’t act). Meaning, the FHA loan becomes even more attractive now and into the future.

With Diane’s 795 credit score, her monthly payment for a conventional loan would only be $1,391.24. Her FHA loan payment would be $1,452.29. (Note that it is the same as Jack’s payment, even though Diane’s credit score is over 100 points better.) In this case, Diane can now save money by using the conventional loan. The conventional loan has the best pricing from the beginning, and it provides the PMI cancellation benefits mentioned in the previous post.

With this example, one can definitely see how FHA loans do not have the same impact when it comes to the interest rate, mortgage insurance, and monthly payment versus conventional loans. Even with such a large gap between the credit scores (680 versus 795), the payment on the FHA loan is the same.

Ultimately, every client situation is unique. For some borrower circumstances (e.g., self-employed, buying a condo, high debt to income ratio, etc.), we may recommend one loan option because the buyer has a better chance to win approval, even if the payment winds up being slightly higher.

Do you know someone planning to buy a home in Georgia?  If they have questions, connect them with me.  I love helping people understand their mortgage options and helping them determine the best approach to financing a home purchase.

Which Type of Mortgage To Use – Scenario 1

August 13, 2019

Now that everyone understands the basics of FHA and conventional loans, let’s do a buyer comparison. Both Jack and Diane want to purchase a $300,000 home. They both have $11,000 (3.7%) for the down payment and qualifying credit scores of 680 for Jack and 795 for Diane.

With Jack’s 680 credit score, his monthly payment for a conventional loan (principal, interest, and mortgage insurance “MI”) would be $1,820.82.  For a FHA loan, his payment would be $1,563.19. There’s no comparison. For Jack, the better deal is the FHA mortgage, even though it has the draw backs of the up-front mortgage insurance and the permanent monthly mortgage insurance payment.

With Diane’s 795 credit score, her monthly payment for a conventional loan would only be $1,582.61. Her FHA loan payment would be $1,542.47.  In this case, Diane is also better off, at least initially, with the FHA loan. One thing to keep in mind is the MI premium. If Diane chooses the FHA loan, that premium is permanent (assuming Congress does not change the law). If she chooses the conventional loan, the insurance will eventually be cancelled, dropping her payment to $1,442. The key question for Diane is, “How long will you stay in the home?” If less than 5 years, Diane’s best bet is the FHA loan. If longer than 5 years, Diane may want to consider the conventional loan.

Notice the FHA payments for these examples. They differ by only about $21 even though the credit scores are drastically different (680 versus 795). This shows why FHA is better for those making a purchase with lower credit scores. The buyer doesn’t see as steep of an increase in their payment.

In the next blog post, we will make the same comparison with a 10% down payment.

Does your friend Scott talk about buying a house?  Does he understand which loan program is best for him?  If not, have Scott contact me. We Dunwoody Mortgage professionals understand the details of these mortgage programs, and we coach our buyers to make the best decision given their circumstances.  Often, with a slight change to their home purchase situation (change of down payment, paying down a credit card balance, etc.), we can help our clients save money with a better interest rate or a lower mortgage insurance cost.  Home buyers should consider all options before buying, and Dunwoody Mortgage offers the service and knowledge to help home buyers make the best decision possible.

More potential changes to FHA loans

August 6, 2019

I’ve thrown up a posts over the past couple of months (here and here) about potential changes for condo purchases using FHA loans. How about a change on FHA loans that is beneficial for everyone!

A new bill working its way through Congress would make mortgage insurance for FHA more like mortgage insurance for conventional loans.

Currently, FHA mortgage insurance is permanent unless the buyer makes a 10% down payment. When making a down payment as large as 10%, often buyers use a conventional loan. Maybe there is a case where someone still wants to do an FHA loan (for example, a foreclosure 3 years ago is OK on FHA loans but not OK for conventional loans), but often 10% down means a buyer is using a conventional loan for their purchase.

With FHA’s current permanent monthly mortgage insurance, it makes FHA loans much less competitive with conventional loans. The new bill looks to change this situation.

If passed, the bill would change the cancellation date on FHA mortgage insurance from “until the loan is paid in full” (meaning permanent for the life of the loan) to when the loan balance is 78% of the homes original value. Meaning, the mortgage insurance is no longer permanent.

The current set up with mortgage insurance on FHA loans really isn’t fair to the home buyer. They are way over charged paying mortgage insurance for the life of the loan, and the change could make FHA loans are more viable alternative for buyers making the minimum down payment on a home purchase.

Can’t decide if an FHA is right for you? Contact me and we’ll find out! If you are buying a home in the state of Georgia, I can also get you prequalified and ready to make an offer on your new home.

Types of Mortgages – Conventional

July 30, 2019

Now let’s take a look at conventional mortgage details.  (Click here to review FHA loan details.  And here is a link to the Home Ready program changes.)

In general, conventional loans are less forgiving of credit issues than are FHA loans.  Conventional loans require longer wait times after derogatory credit events like foreclosure or bankruptcy.  And the borrower’s credit score has a much greater impact on conventional loan pricing versus FHA loans.  The lower one’s credit score, the higher the interest rate.  In some cases, a credit score 100 points lower could cause the borrower’s interest rate to increase by almost one percentage point.

Ultimately, this makes conventional mortgages less attractive to borrowers with lower credit scores and more attractive to those with higher credit scores.

Conventional loans do not require up-front mortgage insurance, but private mortgage insurance (“PMI”) is required for down payments less than 20%.  PMI rates vary based on the borrower’s credit score and down payment.  For the same loan amount, the monthly PMI will be dramatically different for a 690 credit score borrower making a 5% down payment vs. a 780 credit score borrower making a 15% down payment.  PMI is not permanent.  It automatically terminates when the borrower’s loan balance reaches 78% of the original contract price or appraised value (whichever is lower).  And, in certain circumstances, the borrower can request PMI cancellation prior to reaching the 78% threshold.

Borrowers can obtain a conventional loan with a minimum 3% down payment.  This often only makes sense when the borrower’s credit score is 720 or higher.  With a lower score, the PMI cost for a 3% down loan can get pretty expensive.  We often recommend that conventional buyers make a 5% or more down payment to keep PMI costs lower.

Another advantage of conventional loans is the maximum loan amount.  While FHA caps out at a purchase price of around $390,000 using the minimum down payment, conventional loans can go higher.  How much higher?  How about a $500,000 purchase price with a 3% down payment.  That is about 25% higher than the FHA maximum.

In the next posts, we will compare some hypothetical home buyer scenarios to determine which loan is best – conventional or FHA.  Do you know someone who wants to buy a Georgia home?  Please refer them to me.   We Dunwoody Mortgage professionals ask important questions to determine if we can help our clients make slight changes (down payment amount, paying down a credit card balance, etc.) that help them save money with a better interest rate and / or lower PMI premium.  We work hard to deliver excellent service and pricing to our customers, and our consistently positive reviews show our clients are pleased with our work.

 

Types of Mortgages – FHA

July 23, 2019

Given recent mortgage program changes, now is a good time to review the pros and cons of the major loan programs and when borrower circumstances favor one specific loan program.  In the last few years, many of our clients have used the conventional Home Ready program.   Without Home Ready, many of these buyers would have used FHA loans.  Given the Home Ready changes, we expect more future buyers to use FHA loans.

So let’s talk about FHA loans!

  • In the metro-Atlanta area, buyers can purchase homes up to about $390,000 using a minimum down payment (3.5%) FHA loan.  That is a lot of home!
  • Relative to conventional mortgages, FHA loans are generally more forgiving of credit “issues.”  This means lower credit score borrowers will most likely get a better FHA interest rate versus a conventional loan.
  • FHA allows for lower credit scores and shorter wait times following derogatory credit events, such as foreclosure or bankruptcy.  Borrowers typically need a 620 score to qualify.  Depending on other borrower details, Dunwoody Mortgage may be able to close loans where the borrower’s credit score is as low as 580.

Both FHA and conventional loans require monthly mortgage insurance “MI” for down payments less than 20%.  For FHA, the monthly premium is a flat 0.85% of the loan amount.  Conventional loans determine the premium based on the borrower’s credit score and down payment.  FHA loans also have an up-front mortgage insurance premium.  FHA monthly MI is permanent if the down payment is less than 10%.  Note that Congress is now considering a bill to automatically cancel FHA MI similar to how conventional loans cancel the insurance.  More to come on this story.

In the next post, we will review conventional loan details.  For now, if you know someone looking to buy a Georgia home, please refer them to me.  We Dunwoody Mortgage professionals understand the key loan program details and we coach our buyers to make the best decision given their circumstances.  We can help our clients find ways to lower interest and mortgage insurance costs.  We have a strong record full of very positive customer reviews.


Changes coming to Home Ready

July 2, 2019

Fannie Mae has a great loan product called Home Ready. Potential home buyers can qualify even if not a first time home buyer. The blog covered the details of Home Ready in the past. Check out those posts:

One aspect to pay attention to is the income limit. To qualify for Home Ready, a potential buyer’s income can’t exceed 100% of the area median income (AMI) for the area. There are also some areas with no income limits. These areas are determined from the census track (where household income and people are counted in geographic areas).

Here is a handy website where one can look up a property to see about qualifying income limits:

https://homeready-eligibility.fanniemae.com/homeready/

Starting July 20, 2019, Fannie Mae will implement changes to the program. Gone are the no income limit areas. Another change is the qualifying income reduces from 100% of the AMI to 80%. What does this mean:

  • some metro Atlanta areas have no income limits, so a buyer could have an income of $200,000 and still use Home Ready. After July 20th, that will no longer be the case.
  • If an AMI is $80,000, the qualifying income will be now $64,000 (80% of the AMI) instead of the $80,000.

It seems Home Ready is narrowing the pool of potential buyers who can use the program. If you are looking to use Home Ready, talk to your loan officer to see if these changes could impact your home search.

Looking to buy in the state of Georgia, if so, contact me today. We can get you ready to make an offer on a new home in minutes, and see if Home Ready is a program you could take advantage of with your home purchase.

Differences between conventional loans

June 6, 2019

blog-author-clayjeffreys3

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac offer conventional loans. Their guidelines are almost completely identical, yet there are some unique differences that can come in handy under the right circumstances.

Here are some differences between Fannie and Freddie:

Freddie Mac:

  • Often only requires one bank statement (Fannie requires the two most recent bank statements).
  • When doing a refinance, the borrower can take the greater of 1% of the loan amount or $2,000. If the loan is $400,000, then the borrower could get up to $4,000 back and not be a cash out refinance (Fannie Mae has a $2,000 limit).
  • Employed by a family member? Only one year of tax returns are required (Fannie Mae requires 2 years).
  • Student loans in deferment have a payment calculated by taking 0.5% of the total balance (Fannie Mae is 1% of the balance).
  • Self employed buyers only need one year of tax returns if the business is over 5 years old. If less than 5 years, then two years are required (requirements for Fannie Mae are not as straight forward as Freddie Mac*).

Fannie Mae:

  • Higher likelihood of getting a Property Inspection Waiver using a Fannie Mae conventional loan.
  • If a buyer has a second job that loses money as shown on a filed tax return, the loss can be ignored with Fannie Mae so long as the job is not in the same line of work as their primary job (Freddie Mac counts all income losses from tax returns).
  • Student Loan Cash Out – a homeowner can do a cash out refinance to pay off student loans without taking the interest rate increase from doing a cash out refinance.
  • DACA recipients eligible to purchase a home with a Fannie Mae conventional loan (Freddie Mac does not allow DACA buyers).
  • Normally requires fewer months of reserves than Freddie Mac.

spot-the-difference-worksheets-pandaNext time you apply for a home loan and look to do a conventional loan, you may not think it matters if it is a Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae loan. As you just read, choosing Fannie or Freddie under the right situation can make all the difference in the world. That’s why you want to work with a Loan Officer who is aware of these small differences.

Looking to get prequalified for a home purchase in the state of Georgia? If yes, contact me today.  I’ll ask very specific questions about your situation and make sure the correct conventional loan product is chosen.

footer_clayjeffreys4

*With Fannie Mae, self employed buyers may only need 1 year of tax returns regardless of how long the business has been open. The default is two years of tax returns, but could be one year under the right circumstance (low debt to income ratio, high down payment, excellent credit, etc.). 

Potential new rules for condos with FHA loans

March 12, 2019

While potential condo buyers aren’t on pins and needles waiting to hear from HUD like we would be for who wins an election, still, buyers would love to know the direction HUD will go with FHA loans and condos. Current loan guidelines for buying condos with FHA loans are tough. The condominium project must be pre-approved by HUD to use an FHA loan. Then during the loan process, the condo project is re-certified; meaning, the criteria needed to get pre-approved is double checked to make sure the condo is still within the guidelines for its pre-approval.

Basically, buying a condo with an FHA loan is a lot of work. The condo homeowner association (HOA) must go through the hoops to get the complex approved for an FHA loan. Most HOAs don’t want to deal with the burden. Then repeat the process for the loan itself – twice the work for the same payout. Hopefully this will change soon.

A proposal was made a few years ago to HUD that would open up the number of condo complexes eligible to use FHA loans. The loosening of guidelines would also reinstitute spot approvals (similar to what conventional loans do for condos). This makes buying condos WAY easier with FHA loans.

This change will benefit home buyers with average to below average credit making a smaller down payment. Currently, almost all condos are purchased using conventional loans. While someone can qualify for a conventional loan with a credit score of 620+, the mortgage rate and monthly private mortgage insurance rates (for loans with PMI) are significantly higher than an FHA loan. The difference is big – easily over a half a point higher in rate and almost double the monthly PMI (depending on the down payment being made). Home buyers with average to below average credit could be in a position soon to save a couple thousand dollars annually.

Seriously HUD…. What’s the latest?

Looking to buy a condo in Georgia? One program we could use instead of an FHA loan is the Fannie Mae HomeReady loan. This has some advantages over a normal conventional loan that helps those making a minimum down payment on a home purchase. Contact me today, and we’ll see if you qualify for HomeReady whether buying a condo or not.