Archive for September, 2019

American Homebuying Power Grows

September 26, 2019

Overall economic circumstances keep improving for potential homebuyers.  First American’s Real House Price Index (RHPI) shows that Americans’ homebuying power increased consistently from January through July 2019.  The index tracks single-family home price changes adjusted for mortgage interest rate changes and personal income changes.

Mortgage interest rates trended downward during the first half of 2019, and they are even lower now compared to mid-year.  First American reported mortgage rates in January were 4.5%, and rates moved into the 3’s over the summer.  Average household income increased over the same time period.

Decreasing mortgage rates combined with increasing household incomes provide a double boost to Americans’ home buying power.  The Index’s “house-buying power” for consumers increased roughly 10% from January through July.  According to First American’s Chief Economist, Mark Fleming, “House-buying power is at the highest it’s been since we began tracking it in 1991.”

That means now is a great time to buy a home!  Even though home prices have been increasing, the decrease in mortgage rates coupled with household income growth make right now the best time to buy a home in almost 30 years, based on the RHPI measures.

Do you have a Georgia friend who complains about a landlord who won’t fix problems?  Let them know that their homebuying power is stronger than it has been in decades, and connect them with me.  I’ll help them obtain the best home mortgage for their unique situation as quickly as possible.  I’ll help your friend take advantage of today’s really low mortgage rates before they increase to 2018 levels or even higher.  Together, we will fire their unresponsive landlord!

Millennial Home Ownership Survey

September 19, 2019

There are some interesting facts and observations in an August article documenting survey results from Millennial home buyers.  Here’s a link to the full study from lendedu.com.  1,000 people aged 23 to 38 participated in the survey.  Here are some survey results:

  • 58% of respondents say they own their own home.
  • 83% of these home owners obtained a mortgage to buy their home.
  • 75% of these mortgage holders obtained a FHA loan.
  • 16% is the average down payment percentage for the survey respondents.

To me, it is very surprising to me that such a high percentage of these home buyers used the FHA program, especially given the relatively high down payment percentage reported.  What I also find surprising is how the author treats FHA loans vis a vis the private mortgage insurance component of conventional mortgages.

Let’s look at the basics of FHA mortgage insurance (“MI”) vs. conventional (private) mortgage insurance (“PMI”).  FHA charges a 1.75% up-front MI.  On a $300,000 loan, that charge is $5,250.  Assuming a Millennial average 16% down payment, FHA charges a 0.80% monthly MI premium, which equals $200 per month.  And for this loan, the borrower must pay the monthly MI for 11 years.

For PMI on conventional loans, there is no up-front fee.  So our $300,000 mortgage holder is better off by $5,250 to start.  The PMI premium is based on the combination of down payment and the borrower’s credit score.  Let’s assume that a Millennial buyer (we’ll call her “Anna”) has a 680 credit score.  I calculate Anna’s monthly PMI premium at 0.26% or $65 per month.  In addition, the conventional loan PMI will cancel sooner than FHA MI, so Anna will pay conventional loan PMI for less than half the time she would pay FHA loan MI.

Summarizing this example, Anna with a 680 credit score would reap the following mortgage insurance benefits of choosing a conventional loan vs. FHA: (1) Anna saves $5,250 by not having the up-front FHA MI premium rolled into the loan amount; (2) Anna saves $135 per month with the lower PMI rate vs. the FHA MI rate; and (3) Anna stops making mortgage insurance payments way sooner.  And Anna’s PMI payment will be even lower if her credit score is in the 700’s.  From a mortgage insurance perspective, the conventional loan seems like a much better deal.

The author praises the use of FHA mortgages, then later makes the following statements about private mortgage insurance:

  • PMI should be avoided as it will usually cost the homeowner between 0.5% to 1% of the full mortgage amount….”
  • “…it is not great that so many are also paying for PMI as a result of less-than-optimal down payments…”

Such blanket negative statements about PMI concern me.  In our example, and many examples where the borrower has a strong credit score and can make a 10% or more down payment, the numbers often favor conventional loans.  FHA loans are often better when the borrower’s credit score is low or the borrower can only make a down payment of 10% or less.

The key lesson here is to consult a professional mortgage lender (I suggest that this guy for Georgia home buyers) to run the numbers for both FHA and conventional loans.  Then choose the best option given your circumstances.

Planning the move

September 10, 2019

At The Mortgage Blog, we talk often about making a plan for the mortgage. Today, let’s talk about a different type of plan – the move itself!

It makes perfect sense. I mean, we make plans to ensure the home loan goes smoothly. There is a plan for the home we look to buy (area of town, school districts, size of home, size of yard, etc.). I mean, why wouldn’t we tackle moving with the same concepts.

So here’s to planning the move! Where to begin? Let’s begin the same way we begin a home search, with a plan. Just like you’d sort potential homes by number of beds, baths, etc., let’s begin sorting our possessions into categories such as:

  • clothes
  • kitchen items
  • plates
  • glasses
  • decorative items
  • toys
  • important documents
  • toiletries
  • books

Looking at an entire house full of items is overwhelming. Sorting through each category becomes more manageable. With the categories in place, it makes the next step of sorting easier.

Once everything is sorted, it becomes obvious what to do with all of the possessions. Reviewing each category separately, you can begin to see what items you want to keep, what items to sell/donate/give away, and what items simply need to be recycled or thrown away.

The final step is to begin packing as soon as you are able to do so. Planning a summer move? Well, you don’t need winter clothes in the spring. Pack them up! Use the same logic for other items you don’t need access to all of the time. By getting a head start on packing, it will lessen the burden when it comes to packing up the entire house.

Still overwhelmed? Packing and organizing just isn’t your thing? No worries! Lots of people don’t like this stuff. If you want to consult a professional, how about Amber Blandford with Joyful Spaces. Amber owns and operates the professional organizing services provided by Joyful Spaces. When some people run screaming in fear of organizing, Amber feels a rush of joy! She’ll help you get going!

So there are some thoughts on planning a move. Still need to plan on how to pay for the home purchase? I’m always happy to help! Contact me today. If buying in the state of Georgia, I can get you prequalified in a few minutes and have you well on your way to making an offer on your new home!