Archive for May, 2017

PMI vs MIP vs MPI… What is the difference?

May 17, 2017

Lots of acronyms there. What do they all mean?

Many people are familiar with the term “PMI” or Private Mortgage Insurance. This is insurance the borrower pays on behalf of the lender in case of a mortgage default. The insurance protects the lender and becomes a requirement when purchasing a home with less than a 20% down payment (or refinancing with less than 20% equity in the home).

MIP stands for Mortgage Insurance Premium and is completely the same thing as PMI, but that is what mortgage insurance is called on FHA loans.

So what is MPI? That stands for Mortgage Protection Insurance. When buying or refinancing a home, the home owner will get plenty of these offers in the mail in the weeks/months after buying a home. Why? Companies pay people to search through newly recorded deeds at the county. This is legal since the deed is a matter of public record. With the deed information, a company knows your name, your new home address, and who did your loan. The offers for Mortgage Protection Insurance will come regularly in the mail, and these companies make it look like the letter is from your mortgage company. They can be sneaky with these letters.

What does MPI do? If you choose this option, MPI will pay the loan balance off for a borrower in the event of their death. Sounds good, but let’s dig a little deeper. The premiums for this insurance are typically significantly higher thank those for life insurance as they require minimal to no medical examination or health screening. Anyone in any health condition can get this insurance by paying the monthly premiums. The other downside is that as mortgage payments are made, the principal balance of their loan reduces. This means the payout in the event of the borrower’s death reduces… in other words, the premiums stay the same, but the death benefit decreases every month.

MPI is a fantastic option for someone who cannot, for whatever reason, qualify for term life insurance. If you can get term life insurance, it is the better way to go. Typically, people can get more coverage that doesn’t diminish each month for a lower monthly premium.

Just bought your first home and don’t have life insurance? Or maybe you’ve owned your home for a few years, but your family has grown since you last looked at your life insurance coverage. Regardless of your need, my friends at the Sheldon Baker Group can assist you in getting free quotes from the top carriers in the life insurance industry. You can check out the Sheldon Baker Group life insurance page here. You can also call 678-793-2322 or email to sheldon@sheldonbakergroup.com.

Whether you use my friends at the Sheldon Baker Group or someone else, life insurance is important as you own a home and/or have a growing family. Use the MPI offers in the mail as a reminder to evaluate your coverage.

 

Geographic Income Limits for Home Ready Program

May 1, 2017


One potentially limiting aspect of the Home Ready program is that income limits are specified by census tract.  (Notice I said “potentially.”  We will get back to that point very soon.)  To qualify for the program, the borrower’s income must be less than or equal to the income limit set for the geographic area of the subject property.  Fannie Mae specifies and publishes the geographic income limits as part of the program.  Many areas in Metro Atlanta have an annual income cap of $67,200, but there are many other areas that do not have an income limit.  Now back to the word “potentially.”  If the home you want to buy lies in a no-income-limit area, you could make a million dollars per year or even per month and still qualify for a Home Ready loan for that house.

Two key points to remember here:  First of all, the income limits are based the subject property’s location, so you can have varying income limits in different parts of the same county.  In fact, the eligibility maps go down to the street level, which means that houses on one side of a street could carry a $67,200 income limit and houses on the other side of the same street could have no income limit.  Secondly, the income limits apply only to borrowers on the loan.  If two employed people plan to live in the home, but only one of you is on the loan, then the other occupant’s income does not count toward the income limit.  Of course that means that the sole borrower must qualify for the loan using his or her income only.   

So how can you determine whether you qualify for the Home Ready program’s low down payment / low-interest rate / low mortgage insurance benefits?  You can call me at Dunwoody Mortgage!!  We will first discuss your income and the geographic area where you want to buy.  I can look up the area online and determine whether your income qualifies for Home Ready in that area.  If you meet the geographic income limits, we will complete your loan application, pull your credit report, and run your application through our Automated Underwriting System (“AUS”).  The AUS findings will then determine if you do qualify for Home Ready’s great benefits. 

Buying a house in Georgia and curious whether you can obtain a Home Ready loan?  Give me a call and we will review Home Ready and your other loan options.  Don’t think you will qualify?  We at Dunwoody Mortgage have secured loans for many customers who initially thought they would not qualify.  Don’t assume you cannot win loan approval!  Call me and let’s discuss your situation.  We might just surprise you!!