Credit Reports and Qualifying for a Mortgage #3

by

In prior posts we reviewed the credit score and public record components of a credit report.  But even with a qualifying score and a clean public record history, that doesn’t mean you are in the clear.  There are other credit report factors that can create underwriting hurdles which we must overcome.  Here are some other details we consider…

The credit report shows a history of open and closed credit accounts.  Data shown for each account includes:

  • Current account balance.
  • Account credit limit.
  • Account type – credit card, mortgage, student loan, auto loan, etc.
  • Account status – open, closed, collections, etc.
  • Minimum payment – these are important because they are included in the client’s (let’s call her Mindy) debt to income ratio.  If the total of all monthly payments is too high, Mindy might not qualify for the loan desired.
  • Late payment history – late payments are categorized as follows — 30 day lates are not good; 60 day lates are bad, and 90 day lates are really bad.  The report shows the dates of the most recent late payments.

If Mindy’s late payments were made more than 2 or 3 years ago and she has been consistently making on-time payments since then, it likely will not cause loan denial.  However, if Mindy’s late payments occurred after a bankruptcy, then underwriting may deny the loan.  I’ve had this happen where the underwriter said no to a client with a bankruptcy in 2010 followed by two 30-day late payments in 2012.

 credit-score-ratings-chart1

  • Account disputes – if Mindy has officially disputed an account, it will show on her report.  Underwriters do not like account disputes.  This is especially true for FHA mortgages when a disputed account balance exceeds $1,000.  In some cases, the dispute can lead to loan denial.  I’ve had clients who had to go through a multi-week process to get a dispute removed from their credit before we could win loan approval.  I search for the word “dispute” on all credit reports.
  • Collections accounts – when an account has a collections status, this can cause loan denial.  This is especially true for FHA mortgages.  If the total outstanding amount of all collections accounts exceeds $1,000, underwriters will not approve an FHA loan until the balances are paid in full.  I had a client with 3 collections accounts earlier this year.  The client had plenty of cash, so we simply included the payoff of all collections accounts at the closing of her home purchase.

Once again, there is much more to a credit report than the score.  If you know someone who wants to buy a home in Georgia, don’t let them get mislead by a lender in a hurry.  Refer them to Dunwoody Mortgage, we will invest enough time up front to give everyone great confidence that the mortgage will actually close.

 

blog_footer_RShaffer1

 

 

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: